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Effects of a gestational weight gain restriction program for obese women : Sibling pairs’ weight development during the first five years of life

Claesson, Ing Marie ; Josefsson, Ann ; Olhager, Elisabeth LU ; Oldin, Carin and Sydsjö, Gunilla (2018) In Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare 17. p.65-74
Abstract

Objectives: Successful gestational weight gain (GWG) restriction programs for obese (Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2) pregnant women, have not, so far, shown convincing effects on infant's weight development. An intervention starting during the pregnancy might be too late and a pre-conceptional life style change may be preferable. Thus, the aim of this study was to follow children born to mothers who had participated in a weight gain restriction program during pregnancy, and make comparisons with their younger siblings. Study design and main outcome measures: An extended analysis of 262 children belonging to an intervention group and a control group. The effects of BMI at five years of age and weight-for-length/height... (More)

Objectives: Successful gestational weight gain (GWG) restriction programs for obese (Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2) pregnant women, have not, so far, shown convincing effects on infant's weight development. An intervention starting during the pregnancy might be too late and a pre-conceptional life style change may be preferable. Thus, the aim of this study was to follow children born to mothers who had participated in a weight gain restriction program during pregnancy, and make comparisons with their younger siblings. Study design and main outcome measures: An extended analysis of 262 children belonging to an intervention group and a control group. The effects of BMI at five years of age and weight-for-length/height development from two months of age until five years of age were assessed. Results: In the intervention group there was a difference in BMI at five years of age, between index boys and their younger sisters (p = 0.016). Mean BMI was lower among the boys compared with their younger female siblings. Regarding maternal GWG or the Swedish national reference data there was no difference between the index children and their younger siblings within the intervention or control groups or between younger siblings in the two groups. Conclusions: Maternal pre-conceptional lifestyle change may have a positive effect on the child's weight development during the five first years of age. However, the effect of participation in an extensive GWG restriction program when it comes to the impact on the offspring's weight development is still unclear and further research is required.

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author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Follow-up study, Obesity, Sibling, Weight development
in
Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare
volume
17
pages
10 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:30193722
  • scopus:85050104942
ISSN
1877-5756
DOI
10.1016/j.srhc.2018.07.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f5a0e0e6-5da9-4255-94a9-4975f6c8e4f5
date added to LUP
2018-07-31 12:37:29
date last changed
2021-09-22 01:20:22
@article{f5a0e0e6-5da9-4255-94a9-4975f6c8e4f5,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: Successful gestational weight gain (GWG) restriction programs for obese (Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m<sup>2</sup>) pregnant women, have not, so far, shown convincing effects on infant's weight development. An intervention starting during the pregnancy might be too late and a pre-conceptional life style change may be preferable. Thus, the aim of this study was to follow children born to mothers who had participated in a weight gain restriction program during pregnancy, and make comparisons with their younger siblings. Study design and main outcome measures: An extended analysis of 262 children belonging to an intervention group and a control group. The effects of BMI at five years of age and weight-for-length/height development from two months of age until five years of age were assessed. Results: In the intervention group there was a difference in BMI at five years of age, between index boys and their younger sisters (p = 0.016). Mean BMI was lower among the boys compared with their younger female siblings. Regarding maternal GWG or the Swedish national reference data there was no difference between the index children and their younger siblings within the intervention or control groups or between younger siblings in the two groups. Conclusions: Maternal pre-conceptional lifestyle change may have a positive effect on the child's weight development during the five first years of age. However, the effect of participation in an extensive GWG restriction program when it comes to the impact on the offspring's weight development is still unclear and further research is required.</p>},
  author       = {Claesson, Ing Marie and Josefsson, Ann and Olhager, Elisabeth and Oldin, Carin and Sydsjö, Gunilla},
  issn         = {1877-5756},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  pages        = {65--74},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare},
  title        = {Effects of a gestational weight gain restriction program for obese women : Sibling pairs’ weight development during the first five years of life},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.srhc.2018.07.003},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.srhc.2018.07.003},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2018},
}