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Genetic differentiation predicts body size divergence between island and mainland populations of common wall lizards (Podarcis muralis)

Uller, Tobias LU ; Laakkonen, Hanna LU ; Michaelides, Sozos; While, Geoffrey M. LU ; Coulon, Aurelie and Aubret, Fabien (2019) In Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 127(4). p.771-786
Abstract

Small-bodied vertebrates sometimes evolve gigantism on islands, but there is a lack of consistent association with ecological factors or island characteristics. One possible reason is that, even if the ecological conditions are right, body size might fail to diverge on islands that were isolated recently or if there is gene flow between islands and the mainland. We studied body size, ventral colour polymorphism and genetic structure across nine islands and adjacent mainland populations of common wall lizards (Podarcis muralis) off the western coast of France. Population genetic data suggested that island populations might have maintained gene flow after their geographical isolation from the mainland. Island lizards were larger and... (More)

Small-bodied vertebrates sometimes evolve gigantism on islands, but there is a lack of consistent association with ecological factors or island characteristics. One possible reason is that, even if the ecological conditions are right, body size might fail to diverge on islands that were isolated recently or if there is gene flow between islands and the mainland. We studied body size, ventral colour polymorphism and genetic structure across nine islands and adjacent mainland populations of common wall lizards (Podarcis muralis) off the western coast of France. Population genetic data suggested that island populations might have maintained gene flow after their geographical isolation from the mainland. Island lizards were larger and heavier than mainland lizards on average, but the extent of gigantism varied substantially between islands. Island size and distance from the mainland were poor predictors of body size, but lizards from populations that were highly genetically differentiated from the mainland were larger than lizards from less differentiated populations. Colour morphs that were rare on the mainland tended to be more common on islands. We propose that genetic isolation or bottlenecks promote body size evolution in island lizards, which makes it challenging to identify ecological causes of island gigantism without complementary genetic information.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Body size, Colour polymorphism, Common wall lizard, Genetic bottleneck, Genetic differentiation, Genetic isolation, Island gigantism, Podarcis muralis
in
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
volume
127
issue
4
pages
16 pages
publisher
Linnean Society of London
external identifiers
  • scopus:85072709148
ISSN
0024-4066
DOI
10.1093/biolinnean/blz052
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f5d8e428-0800-4722-8d6d-efe4a212eb83
date added to LUP
2019-10-10 12:17:26
date last changed
2019-10-10 12:17:26
@article{f5d8e428-0800-4722-8d6d-efe4a212eb83,
  abstract     = {<p>Small-bodied vertebrates sometimes evolve gigantism on islands, but there is a lack of consistent association with ecological factors or island characteristics. One possible reason is that, even if the ecological conditions are right, body size might fail to diverge on islands that were isolated recently or if there is gene flow between islands and the mainland. We studied body size, ventral colour polymorphism and genetic structure across nine islands and adjacent mainland populations of common wall lizards (Podarcis muralis) off the western coast of France. Population genetic data suggested that island populations might have maintained gene flow after their geographical isolation from the mainland. Island lizards were larger and heavier than mainland lizards on average, but the extent of gigantism varied substantially between islands. Island size and distance from the mainland were poor predictors of body size, but lizards from populations that were highly genetically differentiated from the mainland were larger than lizards from less differentiated populations. Colour morphs that were rare on the mainland tended to be more common on islands. We propose that genetic isolation or bottlenecks promote body size evolution in island lizards, which makes it challenging to identify ecological causes of island gigantism without complementary genetic information.</p>},
  author       = {Uller, Tobias and Laakkonen, Hanna and Michaelides, Sozos and While, Geoffrey M. and Coulon, Aurelie and Aubret, Fabien},
  issn         = {0024-4066},
  keyword      = {Body size,Colour polymorphism,Common wall lizard,Genetic bottleneck,Genetic differentiation,Genetic isolation,Island gigantism,Podarcis muralis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {771--786},
  publisher    = {Linnean Society of London},
  series       = {Biological Journal of the Linnean Society},
  title        = {Genetic differentiation predicts body size divergence between island and mainland populations of common wall lizards (Podarcis muralis)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biolinnean/blz052},
  volume       = {127},
  year         = {2019},
}