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Progression of retinopathy is related to glycaemic control even in patients with mild diabetes mellitus

Henricsson, Marianne LU ; Groop, Leif LU and Heijl, Anders LU (1996) In Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica 74(6). p.528-532
Abstract

To study the progression of retinopathy in patients with mild diabetes mellitus, we examined, in a cohort study, 347 patients treated with diet alone at baseline. The patients participated in an ophthalmological screening and control programme, and diet-treated patients who were examined between January 1990 and July 1992 were included in the study and followed until October 1995. Mean follow-up time was 3.4 ± 1.1 years. The alternative classification of the Wisconsin study was used to classify retinopathy, and the mean HbA(1c) values for the study period, to estimate the level of glycaemic control. At baseline, 314 of the patients (90.5%) had no retinopathy, and 33 (9.5%) had mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In 296 patients... (More)

To study the progression of retinopathy in patients with mild diabetes mellitus, we examined, in a cohort study, 347 patients treated with diet alone at baseline. The patients participated in an ophthalmological screening and control programme, and diet-treated patients who were examined between January 1990 and July 1992 were included in the study and followed until October 1995. Mean follow-up time was 3.4 ± 1.1 years. The alternative classification of the Wisconsin study was used to classify retinopathy, and the mean HbA(1c) values for the study period, to estimate the level of glycaemic control. At baseline, 314 of the patients (90.5%) had no retinopathy, and 33 (9.5%) had mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In 296 patients there was no retinopathy progression, in 27 patients there was progression by 1 level in the retinopathy scale, and in 24 patients by 2 levels or more. In 2 patients there was progression to proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The mean HbA(1c) (%) was 6.5 ± 1.3. Higher HbA(1c) correlated to increased progression (r = 0.16; p = 0.005), and in a multivariate analysis, HbA(1c) remained associated with a progression of retinopathy by 2 levels or more, with a relative risk of 1.4 per percent increase in HbA(1c) (95% CI 1.1-2.0; p = 0.02). Furthermore, the presence of any retinopathy at baseline was associated with progression with a relative risk of 1.7 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.8; p = 0.02). These data indicate that even slightly elevated levels of HbA(1c) might be associated with a risk of retinopathy progression.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Diabetic retinopathy, Diet treatment, Glycaemic control, Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus
in
Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica
volume
74
issue
6
pages
5 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:0030455810
ISSN
1395-3907
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0420.1996.tb00728.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f61a57a3-2b6e-4dbe-87a7-e65ea25a693b
date added to LUP
2019-06-27 20:48:23
date last changed
2019-08-13 09:00:08
@article{f61a57a3-2b6e-4dbe-87a7-e65ea25a693b,
  abstract     = {<p>To study the progression of retinopathy in patients with mild diabetes mellitus, we examined, in a cohort study, 347 patients treated with diet alone at baseline. The patients participated in an ophthalmological screening and control programme, and diet-treated patients who were examined between January 1990 and July 1992 were included in the study and followed until October 1995. Mean follow-up time was 3.4 ± 1.1 years. The alternative classification of the Wisconsin study was used to classify retinopathy, and the mean HbA(1c) values for the study period, to estimate the level of glycaemic control. At baseline, 314 of the patients (90.5%) had no retinopathy, and 33 (9.5%) had mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In 296 patients there was no retinopathy progression, in 27 patients there was progression by 1 level in the retinopathy scale, and in 24 patients by 2 levels or more. In 2 patients there was progression to proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The mean HbA(1c) (%) was 6.5 ± 1.3. Higher HbA(1c) correlated to increased progression (r = 0.16; p = 0.005), and in a multivariate analysis, HbA(1c) remained associated with a progression of retinopathy by 2 levels or more, with a relative risk of 1.4 per percent increase in HbA(1c) (95% CI 1.1-2.0; p = 0.02). Furthermore, the presence of any retinopathy at baseline was associated with progression with a relative risk of 1.7 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.8; p = 0.02). These data indicate that even slightly elevated levels of HbA(1c) might be associated with a risk of retinopathy progression.</p>},
  author       = {Henricsson, Marianne and Groop, Leif and Heijl, Anders},
  issn         = {1395-3907},
  keyword      = {Diabetic retinopathy,Diet treatment,Glycaemic control,Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {528--532},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Progression of retinopathy is related to glycaemic control even in patients with mild diabetes mellitus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0420.1996.tb00728.x},
  volume       = {74},
  year         = {1996},
}