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Effect of preoperative smoking cessation interventions on postoperative complications and smoking cessation

Thomsen, T; Tønnesen, H LU and Møller, A M (2009) In British Journal of Surgery 96(5). p.451-461
Abstract
Background:
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of preoperative smoking cessation interventions on postoperative complications and smoking cessation itself.
Methods:
Relevant databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of preoperative smoking cessation interventions. Trial inclusion, risk of bias assessment and data extraction were performed by two authors. Risk ratios for the above outcomes were calculated and pooled effects estimated using the fixed‐effect method.
Results:
Eleven RCTs were included containing 1194 patients. Smoking interventions were intensive, medium intensity and less intensive. Follow‐up for postoperative complications was 30 days. For smoking cessation it was from... (More)
Background:
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of preoperative smoking cessation interventions on postoperative complications and smoking cessation itself.
Methods:
Relevant databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of preoperative smoking cessation interventions. Trial inclusion, risk of bias assessment and data extraction were performed by two authors. Risk ratios for the above outcomes were calculated and pooled effects estimated using the fixed‐effect method.
Results:
Eleven RCTs were included containing 1194 patients. Smoking interventions were intensive, medium intensity and less intensive. Follow‐up for postoperative complications was 30 days. For smoking cessation it was from the day of surgery to 12 months thereafter. Overall, the interventions significantly reduced the occurrence of complications (pooled risk ratio 0·56 (95 per cent confidence interval 0·41 to 0·78); P < 0·001). Intensive interventions increased smoking cessation rates both before operation and up to 12 months thereafter. The effects of medium to less intensive interventions were not significant. Meta‐analysis of the effect on smoking cessation was not done owing to heterogeneity of data.
Conclusion:
Surgical patients may benefit from intensive preoperative smoking cessation interventions. These include individual counselling initiated at least 4 weeks before operation and nicotine replacement therapy. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Surgery
volume
96
issue
5
pages
11 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:65249151291
ISSN
0007-1323
DOI
10.1002/bjs.6591
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
f62c52e1-ec80-4f95-8354-78460ef5953d
date added to LUP
2018-12-06 15:45:20
date last changed
2019-07-16 04:01:48
@article{f62c52e1-ec80-4f95-8354-78460ef5953d,
  abstract     = {Background:<br>
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of preoperative smoking cessation interventions on postoperative complications and smoking cessation itself.<br>
Methods:<br>
Relevant databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of preoperative smoking cessation interventions. Trial inclusion, risk of bias assessment and data extraction were performed by two authors. Risk ratios for the above outcomes were calculated and pooled effects estimated using the fixed‐effect method.<br>
Results:<br>
Eleven RCTs were included containing 1194 patients. Smoking interventions were intensive, medium intensity and less intensive. Follow‐up for postoperative complications was 30 days. For smoking cessation it was from the day of surgery to 12 months thereafter. Overall, the interventions significantly reduced the occurrence of complications (pooled risk ratio 0·56 (95 per cent confidence interval 0·41 to 0·78); P &lt; 0·001). Intensive interventions increased smoking cessation rates both before operation and up to 12 months thereafter. The effects of medium to less intensive interventions were not significant. Meta‐analysis of the effect on smoking cessation was not done owing to heterogeneity of data.<br>
Conclusion:<br>
Surgical patients may benefit from intensive preoperative smoking cessation interventions. These include individual counselling initiated at least 4 weeks before operation and nicotine replacement therapy. },
  author       = {Thomsen, T and Tønnesen, H and Møller, A M},
  issn         = {0007-1323},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {451--461},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {British Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Effect of preoperative smoking cessation interventions on postoperative complications and smoking cessation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bjs.6591},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2009},
}