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The Core of Parents’ Main Concerns When Having a Child With Cataract and Its Clinical Implications

Gyllén, Jenny; Magnusson, Gunilla and Forsberg, Anna LU (2019) In Journal of Pediatric Nursing 44. p.45-51
Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the main concerns associated with being a parent of a child with cataract and how the parents deal with these concerns. Design and method: Twenty-three parents; 6 mothers, 5 fathers and 6 couples with a child with cataract were included in this study. The parents included some with a personal experience of cataract and some without. Data was collected through 17 in-depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the method of Grounded Theory developed by Charmaz. Results: The Grounded Theory describes the parents’ efforts to balance the child's inability and ability in order to maintain their social functioning and lead a normal life through a process comprising four main... (More)

Purpose: To investigate the main concerns associated with being a parent of a child with cataract and how the parents deal with these concerns. Design and method: Twenty-three parents; 6 mothers, 5 fathers and 6 couples with a child with cataract were included in this study. The parents included some with a personal experience of cataract and some without. Data was collected through 17 in-depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the method of Grounded Theory developed by Charmaz. Results: The Grounded Theory describes the parents’ efforts to balance the child's inability and ability in order to maintain their social functioning and lead a normal life through a process comprising four main categories; Mastering, Collaborating, Facilitating, and Adapting. This process makes the path of transition evident, starting when the child is diagnosed and continuing for several years during her/his growth and development. Conclusion: The core of parent-child interaction is mastering the balance between the child's disability and ability in order to achieve the best possible outcome, visually and habitually. The interactions changes through a process towards adjustment and acceptance. All the parents emphasized that you do what you have to do to achieve a successful visual outcome of the child. Clinical implications: The model provides a comprehensive understanding of parental self-management that can be used by a case manager, preferable a nurse, to pilot the parents through the process.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adaptation, Grounded Theory, Parents, Pediatric cataract, Transition
in
Journal of Pediatric Nursing
volume
44
pages
45 - 51
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85056172899
ISSN
0882-5963
DOI
10.1016/j.pedn.2018.10.017
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f6d1c7b7-6aca-4f41-afdd-d0802141e2fc
date added to LUP
2018-11-23 12:44:25
date last changed
2019-05-27 17:19:47
@article{f6d1c7b7-6aca-4f41-afdd-d0802141e2fc,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose: To investigate the main concerns associated with being a parent of a child with cataract and how the parents deal with these concerns. Design and method: Twenty-three parents; 6 mothers, 5 fathers and 6 couples with a child with cataract were included in this study. The parents included some with a personal experience of cataract and some without. Data was collected through 17 in-depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the method of Grounded Theory developed by Charmaz. Results: The Grounded Theory describes the parents’ efforts to balance the child's inability and ability in order to maintain their social functioning and lead a normal life through a process comprising four main categories; Mastering, Collaborating, Facilitating, and Adapting. This process makes the path of transition evident, starting when the child is diagnosed and continuing for several years during her/his growth and development. Conclusion: The core of parent-child interaction is mastering the balance between the child's disability and ability in order to achieve the best possible outcome, visually and habitually. The interactions changes through a process towards adjustment and acceptance. All the parents emphasized that you do what you have to do to achieve a successful visual outcome of the child. Clinical implications: The model provides a comprehensive understanding of parental self-management that can be used by a case manager, preferable a nurse, to pilot the parents through the process.</p>},
  author       = {Gyllén, Jenny and Magnusson, Gunilla and Forsberg, Anna},
  issn         = {0882-5963},
  keyword      = {Adaptation,Grounded Theory,Parents,Pediatric cataract,Transition},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {45--51},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Pediatric Nursing},
  title        = {The Core of Parents’ Main Concerns When Having a Child With Cataract and Its Clinical Implications},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2018.10.017},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2019},
}