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S100 protein, an early and prognostic serum marker for brain damage following cardiac surgery

Blomqvist, S; Westaby, S; Alling, Christer LU ; Johnsson, Per and Jönsson, Henrik LU (1996) In Scandinavian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 30(Suppl 44). p.72-72
Abstract

S100 protein is a marker for brain damage easily analysed in blood. The serum level immediatly after termination of extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is increased and associated to age and the duration of perfusion. A prolonged residual concentration indicates cellular brain damage. The objective of this study was to ascertain if the prognosis of individual patients, with stroke following ECC, could be predicted by the S100 levels. 224 patients with an uneventful outcome constituted a reference population. Blood samples for the analysis of S100 were collected at termination of ECC (TO) and at 5, 15 and 48 hours thereafter. Eight patients with stroke following ECC were analysed. In 4, S100 levels continued to increase after ECC. The... (More)

S100 protein is a marker for brain damage easily analysed in blood. The serum level immediatly after termination of extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is increased and associated to age and the duration of perfusion. A prolonged residual concentration indicates cellular brain damage. The objective of this study was to ascertain if the prognosis of individual patients, with stroke following ECC, could be predicted by the S100 levels. 224 patients with an uneventful outcome constituted a reference population. Blood samples for the analysis of S100 were collected at termination of ECC (TO) and at 5, 15 and 48 hours thereafter. Eight patients with stroke following ECC were analysed. In 4, S100 levels continued to increase after ECC. The volume of brain infarctions were large and in 3 of the patients outcome was fatal. In 4 other patients with small volume brain injury S100 dropped initially, but after 5 hours the elimination slowed down, indicating a small but persistant release. In 3 of these patients recovery was complete or with minor residuals. The fourth patient never regained consciousness and died. The levels from serial S100 measurements early after cardiac surgery were related to the size of brain injury and a prognostic value is therefore suggested.

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author
publishing date
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
volume
30
issue
Suppl 44
pages
1 pages
publisher
Scandinavian University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:33747698437
ISSN
0036-5580
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
f801030f-b1c8-4f04-9f4e-0159e0e77eab
date added to LUP
2017-08-23 14:37:33
date last changed
2017-09-19 16:26:42
@article{f801030f-b1c8-4f04-9f4e-0159e0e77eab,
  abstract     = {<p>S100 protein is a marker for brain damage easily analysed in blood. The serum level immediatly after termination of extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is increased and associated to age and the duration of perfusion. A prolonged residual concentration indicates cellular brain damage. The objective of this study was to ascertain if the prognosis of individual patients, with stroke following ECC, could be predicted by the S100 levels. 224 patients with an uneventful outcome constituted a reference population. Blood samples for the analysis of S100 were collected at termination of ECC (TO) and at 5, 15 and 48 hours thereafter. Eight patients with stroke following ECC were analysed. In 4, S100 levels continued to increase after ECC. The volume of brain infarctions were large and in 3 of the patients outcome was fatal. In 4 other patients with small volume brain injury S100 dropped initially, but after 5 hours the elimination slowed down, indicating a small but persistant release. In 3 of these patients recovery was complete or with minor residuals. The fourth patient never regained consciousness and died. The levels from serial S100 measurements early after cardiac surgery were related to the size of brain injury and a prognostic value is therefore suggested.</p>},
  author       = {Blomqvist, S and Westaby, S and Alling, Christer and Johnsson, Per and Jönsson, Henrik},
  issn         = {0036-5580},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Suppl 44},
  pages        = {72--72},
  publisher    = {Scandinavian University Press},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery},
  title        = {S100 protein, an early and prognostic serum marker for brain damage following cardiac surgery},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {1996},
}