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Is it possible to gain energy at work? A questionnaire study in primary health care

Ejlertsson, Lina LU ; Heijbel, Bodil LU ; Brorsson, Annika LU and Andersson, H. Ingemar (2020) In Primary Health Care Research and Development 21.
Abstract

Abstract Objectives: The area of regenerative work is still close to unexplored. The aim was to explore the possibility for employees to gain energy at work. Methods: Questionnaire to all employees (n = 599) from different professions in public and private primary health care centers in one health care district in Sweden. The questionnaire, which had a salutogenic perspective, included information on self-rated health, psychosocial work environment and experiences, recovery, social climate, and energy. Having an energy-building experience was defined by a positive response to two combined questions regarding energy at work. Analyses were performed with bivariate correlation and multiple logistic regression. Results: The response rate... (More)

Abstract Objectives: The area of regenerative work is still close to unexplored. The aim was to explore the possibility for employees to gain energy at work. Methods: Questionnaire to all employees (n = 599) from different professions in public and private primary health care centers in one health care district in Sweden. The questionnaire, which had a salutogenic perspective, included information on self-rated health, psychosocial work environment and experiences, recovery, social climate, and energy. Having an energy-building experience was defined by a positive response to two combined questions regarding energy at work. Analyses were performed with bivariate correlation and multiple logistic regression. Results: The response rate was 84%. Health and energy correlated positively (r = 0.54). In total, 44.5% of the employees reported having an energy-building experience. Predictors for having an energy-building experience were recovery [positive odds ratio (POR) = 2.78], autonomy (POR = 2.26), positive workplace characteristics (POR = 2.09), and internal work experiences (POR = 1.88). Conclusions: The results support the hypothesis that it is possible to gain energy at work, an area that is still close to unexplored. There is a high correlation between energy and health. Employees' energy-building experiences relate to well-being at work and correlates to recovery, autonomy, positive workplace characteristics, and positive internal work experiences. This knowledge can help in improving future work environment development.

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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
health promotion, healthy work conditions, Key words: energy, occupational health, primary health care, salutogenic
in
Primary Health Care Research and Development
volume
21
article number
614
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85097978312
  • pmid:33327974
ISSN
1463-4236
DOI
10.1017/S1463423620000614
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f813f78a-76bc-43c4-80fb-5d1a2749515d
date added to LUP
2021-01-08 12:48:53
date last changed
2021-03-03 05:09:25
@article{f813f78a-76bc-43c4-80fb-5d1a2749515d,
  abstract     = {<p>Abstract Objectives: The area of regenerative work is still close to unexplored. The aim was to explore the possibility for employees to gain energy at work. Methods: Questionnaire to all employees (n = 599) from different professions in public and private primary health care centers in one health care district in Sweden. The questionnaire, which had a salutogenic perspective, included information on self-rated health, psychosocial work environment and experiences, recovery, social climate, and energy. Having an energy-building experience was defined by a positive response to two combined questions regarding energy at work. Analyses were performed with bivariate correlation and multiple logistic regression. Results: The response rate was 84%. Health and energy correlated positively (r = 0.54). In total, 44.5% of the employees reported having an energy-building experience. Predictors for having an energy-building experience were recovery [positive odds ratio (POR) = 2.78], autonomy (POR = 2.26), positive workplace characteristics (POR = 2.09), and internal work experiences (POR = 1.88). Conclusions: The results support the hypothesis that it is possible to gain energy at work, an area that is still close to unexplored. There is a high correlation between energy and health. Employees' energy-building experiences relate to well-being at work and correlates to recovery, autonomy, positive workplace characteristics, and positive internal work experiences. This knowledge can help in improving future work environment development. </p>},
  author       = {Ejlertsson, Lina and Heijbel, Bodil and Brorsson, Annika and Andersson, H. Ingemar},
  issn         = {1463-4236},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {Primary Health Care Research and Development},
  title        = {Is it possible to gain energy at work? A questionnaire study in primary health care},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1463423620000614},
  doi          = {10.1017/S1463423620000614},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2020},
}