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Simulation based investigation of achieving low temperature combustion with methanol in a direct injected compression ignition engine

Svensson, Erik LU and Verhelst, Sebastian LU (2019) SAE World Congress Experience, WCX 2019 In SAE Technical Papers 2019.
Abstract


Low temperature combustion concepts used in compression ignition engines have shown to be able to produce simultaneous reduction of oxides of nitrogen and soot as well as generating higher gross indicated efficiencies compared to conventional diesel combustion. This is achieved by a combination of premixing, dilution and optimization of combustion phasing. Low temperature combustion can be complemented by moving away from fossil fuels in order to reduce the net output of CO
2
emissions. Alternative fuels are preferably liquid and of sufficient... (More)


Low temperature combustion concepts used in compression ignition engines have shown to be able to produce simultaneous reduction of oxides of nitrogen and soot as well as generating higher gross indicated efficiencies compared to conventional diesel combustion. This is achieved by a combination of premixing, dilution and optimization of combustion phasing. Low temperature combustion can be complemented by moving away from fossil fuels in order to reduce the net output of CO
2
emissions. Alternative fuels are preferably liquid and of sufficient energy density. As such methanol is proposed as a viable option. This paper reports the results from a simulation based investigation on a heavy-duty multi-cylinder direct injection compression ignition engine with standard compression ratio. The engine was simulated using two different fuels: methanol and gasoline with an octane number of 70. The primary objective of the study was to find the optimal engine settings which maximized the brake efficiency for the engine. A secondary objective was to find the optimal injection strategy and combustion mode that would result if the brake efficiency was targeted. Comparing methanol with gasoline, the brake efficiency was on average 5.5% higher with methanol. This increase stemmed from a reduction of in-cylinder exhaust loss which was due to higher specific heats and favorable combustion phasing. Furthermore there was a significant difference in the optimal injection strategy comparing methanol and gasoline. Due to the higher octane number of methanol, all the fuel could be injected before the start of combustion. Consequently, an injection strategy typical for the low temperature combustion concept partially premixed combustion resulted. The injection strategy with gasoline, on the other hand, was similar to what is typically found in conventional diesel engines.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
host publication
Technical Paper - WCX SAE World Congress Experience
series title
SAE Technical Papers
volume
2019
article number
2019-01-1152
publisher
Society of Automotive Engineers
conference name
SAE World Congress Experience, WCX 2019
conference location
Detroit, United States
conference dates
2019-04-09 - 2019-04-11
external identifiers
  • scopus:85064690633
ISSN
0148-7191
DOI
10.4271/2019-01-1152
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f8776bbe-6b02-4a60-83e4-6227080653ea
date added to LUP
2019-05-03 11:57:20
date last changed
2020-04-07 05:23:11
@inproceedings{f8776bbe-6b02-4a60-83e4-6227080653ea,
  abstract     = {<p><br>
                                                         Low temperature combustion concepts used in compression ignition engines have shown to be able to produce simultaneous reduction of oxides of nitrogen and soot as well as generating higher gross indicated efficiencies compared to conventional diesel combustion. This is achieved by a combination of premixing, dilution and optimization of combustion phasing. Low temperature combustion can be complemented by moving away from fossil fuels in order to reduce the net output of CO                             <br>
                            <sub>2</sub><br>
                                                          emissions. Alternative fuels are preferably liquid and of sufficient energy density. As such methanol is proposed as a viable option. This paper reports the results from a simulation based investigation on a heavy-duty multi-cylinder direct injection compression ignition engine with standard compression ratio. The engine was simulated using two different fuels: methanol and gasoline with an octane number of 70. The primary objective of the study was to find the optimal engine settings which maximized the brake efficiency for the engine. A secondary objective was to find the optimal injection strategy and combustion mode that would result if the brake efficiency was targeted. Comparing methanol with gasoline, the brake efficiency was on average 5.5% higher with methanol. This increase stemmed from a reduction of in-cylinder exhaust loss which was due to higher specific heats and favorable combustion phasing. Furthermore there was a significant difference in the optimal injection strategy comparing methanol and gasoline. Due to the higher octane number of methanol, all the fuel could be injected before the start of combustion. Consequently, an injection strategy typical for the low temperature combustion concept partially premixed combustion resulted. The injection strategy with gasoline, on the other hand, was similar to what is typically found in conventional diesel engines.                         <br>
                        </p>},
  author       = {Svensson, Erik and Verhelst, Sebastian},
  booktitle    = {Technical Paper -  WCX SAE World Congress Experience },
  issn         = {0148-7191},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  publisher    = {Society of Automotive Engineers},
  series       = {SAE Technical Papers},
  title        = {Simulation based investigation of achieving low temperature combustion with methanol in a direct injected compression ignition engine},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4271/2019-01-1152},
  doi          = {10.4271/2019-01-1152},
  volume       = {2019},
  year         = {2019},
}