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Fabrication and characterisation of a silicon-borosilicate glass microfluidic device for synchrotron-based hard X-ray spectroscopy studies

Micheal Raj, Pushparani LU ; Barbe, Laurent ; Andersson, Martin LU ; De Albuquerque Moreira, Milena ; Haase, Dörthe LU ; Wootton, James LU ; Nehzati, Susan LU ; Terry, Ann E. LU ; Friel, Ross J. LU and Tenje, Maria LU , et al. (2021) In RSC Advances 11(47). p.29859-29869
Abstract

Some of the most fundamental chemical building blocks of life on Earth are the metal elements. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an element-specific technique that can analyse the local atomic and electronic structure of, for example, the active sites in catalysts and energy materials and allow the metal sites in biological samples to be identified and understood. A microfluidic device capable of withstanding the intense hard X-ray beams of a 4th generation synchrotron and harsh chemical sample conditions is presented in this work. The device is evaluated at theK-edges of iron and bromine and theL3-edge of lead, in both transmission and fluorescence mode detection and in a wide range of sample concentrations, as low as... (More)

Some of the most fundamental chemical building blocks of life on Earth are the metal elements. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an element-specific technique that can analyse the local atomic and electronic structure of, for example, the active sites in catalysts and energy materials and allow the metal sites in biological samples to be identified and understood. A microfluidic device capable of withstanding the intense hard X-ray beams of a 4th generation synchrotron and harsh chemical sample conditions is presented in this work. The device is evaluated at theK-edges of iron and bromine and theL3-edge of lead, in both transmission and fluorescence mode detection and in a wide range of sample concentrations, as low as 0.001 M. The device is fabricated in silicon and glass with plasma etched microchannels defined in the silicon wafer before anodic bonding of the glass wafer into a complete device. The device is supported with a well-designed printed chip holder that made the microfluidic device portable and easy to handle. The chip holder plays a pivotal role in mounting the delicate microfluidic device on the beamline stage. Testing validated that the device was sufficiently robust to contain and flow through harsh acids and toxic samples. There was also no significant radiation damage to the device observed, despite focusing with intense X-ray beams for multiple hours. The quality of X-ray spectra collected is comparable to that from standard methods; hence we present a robust microfluidic device to analyse liquid samples using synchrotron XAS.

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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
RSC Advances
volume
11
issue
47
pages
11 pages
publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
external identifiers
  • scopus:85116496135
  • pmid:35479529
ISSN
2046-2069
DOI
10.1039/d1ra05270e
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
Publisher Copyright: © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2021.
id
f96aa79d-b9c2-4184-a7d8-8cdfd4545a45
date added to LUP
2021-10-21 09:34:23
date last changed
2024-05-04 14:43:25
@article{f96aa79d-b9c2-4184-a7d8-8cdfd4545a45,
  abstract     = {{<p>Some of the most fundamental chemical building blocks of life on Earth are the metal elements. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an element-specific technique that can analyse the local atomic and electronic structure of, for example, the active sites in catalysts and energy materials and allow the metal sites in biological samples to be identified and understood. A microfluidic device capable of withstanding the intense hard X-ray beams of a 4th generation synchrotron and harsh chemical sample conditions is presented in this work. The device is evaluated at theK-edges of iron and bromine and theL<sub>3</sub>-edge of lead, in both transmission and fluorescence mode detection and in a wide range of sample concentrations, as low as 0.001 M. The device is fabricated in silicon and glass with plasma etched microchannels defined in the silicon wafer before anodic bonding of the glass wafer into a complete device. The device is supported with a well-designed printed chip holder that made the microfluidic device portable and easy to handle. The chip holder plays a pivotal role in mounting the delicate microfluidic device on the beamline stage. Testing validated that the device was sufficiently robust to contain and flow through harsh acids and toxic samples. There was also no significant radiation damage to the device observed, despite focusing with intense X-ray beams for multiple hours. The quality of X-ray spectra collected is comparable to that from standard methods; hence we present a robust microfluidic device to analyse liquid samples using synchrotron XAS.</p>}},
  author       = {{Micheal Raj, Pushparani and Barbe, Laurent and Andersson, Martin and De Albuquerque Moreira, Milena and Haase, Dörthe and Wootton, James and Nehzati, Susan and Terry, Ann E. and Friel, Ross J. and Tenje, Maria and Sigfridsson Clauss, Kajsa G.V.}},
  issn         = {{2046-2069}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  month        = {{08}},
  number       = {{47}},
  pages        = {{29859--29869}},
  publisher    = {{Royal Society of Chemistry}},
  series       = {{RSC Advances}},
  title        = {{Fabrication and characterisation of a silicon-borosilicate glass microfluidic device for synchrotron-based hard X-ray spectroscopy studies}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d1ra05270e}},
  doi          = {{10.1039/d1ra05270e}},
  volume       = {{11}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}