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ICESat/GLAS Canopy Height Sensitivity Inferred from Airborne Lidar

Mahoney, Craig; Hopkinson, Chris; Held, Alex; Kljun, Natascha LU and van Gorsel, Eva (2016) In Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing 82(5). p.351-363
Abstract
Variations in laser properties and data acquisition times introduced inconsistencies in Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) data. The effect of data inconsistencies, on two GLAS height retrieval methods, from three study sites, are investigated and validated against airborne laser scanning (ALS) percentile heights, from three data sources: all/first return point clouds, and raster canopy height models. GLAS/ALS controls were established as a basis against which the influence of laser number, transmission energy, and seasonality were assessed through comparison statistics. The favored GLAS height method best compared with ALS 95th percentile heights from an all return point cloud. Optimal GLAS data (R2 = 0.69, RMSE = 8.10 m) were noted... (More)
Variations in laser properties and data acquisition times introduced inconsistencies in Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) data. The effect of data inconsistencies, on two GLAS height retrieval methods, from three study sites, are investigated and validated against airborne laser scanning (ALS) percentile heights, from three data sources: all/first return point clouds, and raster canopy height models. GLAS/ALS controls were established as a basis against which the influence of laser number, transmission energy, and seasonality were assessed through comparison statistics. The favored GLAS height method best compared with ALS 95th percentile heights from an all return point cloud. Optimal GLAS data (R2 = 0.69, RMSE = 8.10 m) were noted when GLAS acquired data during summertime from high energy, laser three transmissions. As GLAS data can be used in global biomass assessments, there is a need to understand and quantify the influence of these data inconsistencies on canopy height estimates. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing
volume
82
issue
5
pages
13 pages
external identifiers
  • scopus:84969939773
ISSN
0099-1112
DOI
10.14358/PERS.82.5.351
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
f9c4ad54-bf13-4e52-9c4e-d6b9b11d9ca7
date added to LUP
2018-06-12 13:05:56
date last changed
2018-09-16 04:55:48
@article{f9c4ad54-bf13-4e52-9c4e-d6b9b11d9ca7,
  abstract     = {Variations in laser properties and data acquisition times introduced inconsistencies in Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) data. The effect of data inconsistencies, on two GLAS height retrieval methods, from three study sites, are investigated and validated against airborne laser scanning (ALS) percentile heights, from three data sources: all/first return point clouds, and raster canopy height models. GLAS/ALS controls were established as a basis against which the influence of laser number, transmission energy, and seasonality were assessed through comparison statistics. The favored GLAS height method best compared with ALS 95th percentile heights from an all return point cloud. Optimal GLAS data (R2 = 0.69, RMSE = 8.10 m) were noted when GLAS acquired data during summertime from high energy, laser three transmissions. As GLAS data can be used in global biomass assessments, there is a need to understand and quantify the influence of these data inconsistencies on canopy height estimates. },
  author       = {Mahoney, Craig and Hopkinson, Chris and Held, Alex and Kljun, Natascha and van Gorsel, Eva},
  issn         = {0099-1112},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {351--363},
  series       = {Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing},
  title        = {ICESat/GLAS Canopy Height Sensitivity Inferred from Airborne Lidar},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.14358/PERS.82.5.351},
  volume       = {82},
  year         = {2016},
}