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Incident reporting and level of MR safety education : A Danish national study

Blankholm, A. D. and Hansson, B. LU (2019) In Radiography
Abstract

Introduction: MR-safety remains a concern among MR professionals. We aimed to evaluate the extent of MR-related incidents using a national database and a questionnaire among MR professionals and to identify possible predictors for MR-related incidents. Methods: MR-related incidents reported to a national database from 2015 to 2017 were scrutinized. A national online survey focussing on MR safety and education was performed. Quantitative analyses, descriptive statistics and regression analyses were used. Results: The database included 196, 97 and 100 direct MR-related incidents in 2015, 2016 and 2017, respectively. Regarding the questionnaire, 208 MR professionals responded. Within the last year, 33% had been involved in an MR-related... (More)

Introduction: MR-safety remains a concern among MR professionals. We aimed to evaluate the extent of MR-related incidents using a national database and a questionnaire among MR professionals and to identify possible predictors for MR-related incidents. Methods: MR-related incidents reported to a national database from 2015 to 2017 were scrutinized. A national online survey focussing on MR safety and education was performed. Quantitative analyses, descriptive statistics and regression analyses were used. Results: The database included 196, 97 and 100 direct MR-related incidents in 2015, 2016 and 2017, respectively. Regarding the questionnaire, 208 MR professionals responded. Within the last year, 33% had been involved in an MR-related incident that was reported in the national database. At some time in their working life, 53% had been involved in an MR-related incident that was reported, but 25% had been involved in an incident that was not reported. The responses to the questionnaire reflected far more incidents than those reported to the database for all categories. Sixty-one percent of respondents indicated that external personnel in the MR environment are a safety risk. External personnel in the MR environment were found to be a predictor for reported and unreported MR-related incidents with odds ratio (OR) = 2.07; p = 0.033 and OR = 5.17; p = 0.0005 respectively. Conclusion: There seems to be severe underreporting of MR-related incidents. External personnel in the MR-environment and scanning patients in anaesthesia were found to be predictors for both reported and unreported MR-related incidents. Regulations regarding the minimum required MR safety education of different groups of MR professionals and external personnel are recommended. Implications for practice: Enforcing MR safety education and highlighting the importance of MR safety within hospital organisations would contribute to better patient and personnel safety.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
MR safety, MR safety education, MR safety incident reporting, Patient safety
in
Radiography
publisher
W.B. Saunders Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85075427551
ISSN
1078-8174
DOI
10.1016/j.radi.2019.10.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fae7295b-bbfd-4472-a256-9850a0615a0a
date added to LUP
2019-12-09 12:59:23
date last changed
2020-01-13 02:35:10
@article{fae7295b-bbfd-4472-a256-9850a0615a0a,
  abstract     = {<p>Introduction: MR-safety remains a concern among MR professionals. We aimed to evaluate the extent of MR-related incidents using a national database and a questionnaire among MR professionals and to identify possible predictors for MR-related incidents. Methods: MR-related incidents reported to a national database from 2015 to 2017 were scrutinized. A national online survey focussing on MR safety and education was performed. Quantitative analyses, descriptive statistics and regression analyses were used. Results: The database included 196, 97 and 100 direct MR-related incidents in 2015, 2016 and 2017, respectively. Regarding the questionnaire, 208 MR professionals responded. Within the last year, 33% had been involved in an MR-related incident that was reported in the national database. At some time in their working life, 53% had been involved in an MR-related incident that was reported, but 25% had been involved in an incident that was not reported. The responses to the questionnaire reflected far more incidents than those reported to the database for all categories. Sixty-one percent of respondents indicated that external personnel in the MR environment are a safety risk. External personnel in the MR environment were found to be a predictor for reported and unreported MR-related incidents with odds ratio (OR) = 2.07; p = 0.033 and OR = 5.17; p = 0.0005 respectively. Conclusion: There seems to be severe underreporting of MR-related incidents. External personnel in the MR-environment and scanning patients in anaesthesia were found to be predictors for both reported and unreported MR-related incidents. Regulations regarding the minimum required MR safety education of different groups of MR professionals and external personnel are recommended. Implications for practice: Enforcing MR safety education and highlighting the importance of MR safety within hospital organisations would contribute to better patient and personnel safety.</p>},
  author       = {Blankholm, A. D. and Hansson, B.},
  issn         = {1078-8174},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  publisher    = {W.B. Saunders Ltd},
  series       = {Radiography},
  title        = {Incident reporting and level of MR safety education : A Danish national study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radi.2019.10.007},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.radi.2019.10.007},
  year         = {2019},
}