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The cell wall composition of Norway spruce earlywood and latewood revisited

Fredriksson, Maria LU ; Bjerregaard Pedersen, Nanna and Garbrecht Thygesen, Lisbeth (2017) 13th annual meeting of the Northern European Network for Wood Science and Engineering (WSE2017) p.148-153
Abstract
It is well known that the xylem of gymnosperm trees consists mainly of tracheids and that the dimensions of these cells change over the growth season in temperate regions. When looking at a micrograph of a cross section of a growth ring, it can be seen that early in the season tracheids have larger radial diameters and thin walls, while tracheids formed later in the growth season have smaller radial diameters and thicker walls. However, information on possible chemical differences between these two regions of the growth ring is less abundant. According to a few published studies, earlywood normally contains more lignin relative to cellulose compared to latewood. For studies based on traditional compositional analysis and with results given... (More)
It is well known that the xylem of gymnosperm trees consists mainly of tracheids and that the dimensions of these cells change over the growth season in temperate regions. When looking at a micrograph of a cross section of a growth ring, it can be seen that early in the season tracheids have larger radial diameters and thin walls, while tracheids formed later in the growth season have smaller radial diameters and thicker walls. However, information on possible chemical differences between these two regions of the growth ring is less abundant. According to a few published studies, earlywood normally contains more lignin relative to cellulose compared to latewood. For studies based on traditional compositional analysis and with results given per gram dry matter, this result is hardly surprising, as it simply expresses that a larger part of earlywood cell wall material consists of lignin-rich middle lamella because cells have larger diameters and thinner walls. However, a few studies based on ultraviolet microscopy indicate that differences in biopolymer composition also are seen when individual cell wall layers are analysed. In this study, we used Raman microspectroscopy to assess the relative biopolymer composition of earlywood and latewood secondary cell walls from Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and compared the biopolymer composition to infrared spectroscopy performed on isolated earlywood and latewood from the exact same growth rings. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Raman microspectroscopy, cell wall composition, earlywood, latewood
pages
148 - 153
conference name
13th annual meeting of the Northern European Network for Wood Science and Engineering (WSE2017)
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fb49e1cc-19fe-4c22-b7f2-7e1ea49abe91
date added to LUP
2017-10-03 09:53:36
date last changed
2018-06-11 13:47:43
@misc{fb49e1cc-19fe-4c22-b7f2-7e1ea49abe91,
  abstract     = {It is well known that the xylem of gymnosperm trees consists mainly of tracheids and that the dimensions of these cells change over the growth season in temperate regions. When looking at a micrograph of a cross section of a growth ring, it can be seen that early in the season tracheids have larger radial diameters and thin walls, while tracheids formed later in the growth season have smaller radial diameters and thicker walls. However, information on possible chemical differences between these two regions of the growth ring is less abundant. According to a few published studies, earlywood normally contains more lignin relative to cellulose compared to latewood. For studies based on traditional compositional analysis and with results given per gram dry matter, this result is hardly surprising, as it simply expresses that a larger part of earlywood cell wall material consists of lignin-rich middle lamella because cells have larger diameters and thinner walls. However, a few studies based on ultraviolet microscopy indicate that differences in biopolymer composition also are seen when individual cell wall layers are analysed. In this study, we used Raman microspectroscopy to assess the relative biopolymer composition of earlywood and latewood secondary cell walls from Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and compared the biopolymer composition to infrared spectroscopy performed on isolated earlywood and latewood from the exact same growth rings.},
  author       = {Fredriksson, Maria and Bjerregaard Pedersen, Nanna and Garbrecht Thygesen, Lisbeth},
  keyword      = {Raman microspectroscopy,cell wall composition,earlywood,latewood},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {148--153},
  title        = {The cell wall composition of Norway spruce earlywood and latewood revisited},
  year         = {2017},
}