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Some Thoughts on How to Align the Theoretical Understanding of Team Performance with Resilience Engineering Theory

Bergström, Johan LU ; Henriqson, Eder and Dahlström, Nicklas LU (2014) In Ashgate Studies in Resilience Engineering 2.
Abstract
Recent contributions to the field of Resilience Engineering (RE) have added to the continuous development of new concepts and methodologies to improve resilience at different organisational levels. Part of these contributions has focused on training for adaptive capacity of individuals and teams to cope with changes and disturbances of work, since literature recognise that working tasks (at least in complex settings) are not as stable as procedures, manuals and regulations might depict. It is becoming accepted that more is needed than training for recognition of pre-defined situations and application of corresponding procedures, that is, individuals and teams should be prepared by their training to also cope with unexpected situations. In... (More)
Recent contributions to the field of Resilience Engineering (RE) have added to the continuous development of new concepts and methodologies to improve resilience at different organisational levels. Part of these contributions has focused on training for adaptive capacity of individuals and teams to cope with changes and disturbances of work, since literature recognise that working tasks (at least in complex settings) are not as stable as procedures, manuals and regulations might depict. It is becoming accepted that more is needed than training for recognition of pre-defined situations and application of corresponding procedures, that is, individuals and teams should be prepared by their training to also cope with unexpected situations. In previous volumes of RE contributions we have introduced new methods in order to address these unexpected situations (Bergström, Dahlström and Petersen, 2011; Dekker, Dahlström, van Winsen and Nyce, 2008). In this volume we will rather discuss the theoretical foundation of team training and the potential to align such a foundation with RE theory. Guided by two of the four cornerstones of RE

(Hollnagel, 2011) our argument is that traditional approaches to sharp-end training should be reviewed, revised and readapted to concepts more aligned with RE thinking. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
host publication
Resilience Engineering in Practice
series title
Ashgate Studies in Resilience Engineering
editor
Nemeth, Christopher P.; Hollnagel, Erik; and
volume
2
pages
12 pages
publisher
Ashgate
external identifiers
  • scopus:85052333460
ISBN
9781472425157
9781317065234
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fdd8f979-29a3-49f0-ae8d-f97c01fda21d (old id 4175457)
alternative location
https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9781317065234
date added to LUP
2013-11-27 10:21:47
date last changed
2019-02-20 09:19:58
@inbook{fdd8f979-29a3-49f0-ae8d-f97c01fda21d,
  abstract     = {Recent contributions to the field of Resilience Engineering (RE) have added to the continuous development of new concepts and methodologies to improve resilience at different organisational levels. Part of these contributions has focused on training for adaptive capacity of individuals and teams to cope with changes and disturbances of work, since literature recognise that working tasks (at least in complex settings) are not as stable as procedures, manuals and regulations might depict. It is becoming accepted that more is needed than training for recognition of pre-defined situations and application of corresponding procedures, that is, individuals and teams should be prepared by their training to also cope with unexpected situations. In previous volumes of RE contributions we have introduced new methods in order to address these unexpected situations (Bergström, Dahlström and Petersen, 2011; Dekker, Dahlström, van Winsen and Nyce, 2008). In this volume we will rather discuss the theoretical foundation of team training and the potential to align such a foundation with RE theory. Guided by two of the four cornerstones of RE<br/><br/>(Hollnagel, 2011) our argument is that traditional approaches to sharp-end training should be reviewed, revised and readapted to concepts more aligned with RE thinking.},
  author       = {Bergström, Johan and Henriqson, Eder and Dahlström, Nicklas},
  editor       = {Nemeth, Christopher P. and Hollnagel, Erik},
  isbn         = {9781472425157},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {12},
  publisher    = {Ashgate},
  series       = {Ashgate Studies in Resilience Engineering},
  title        = {Some Thoughts on How to Align the Theoretical Understanding of Team Performance with Resilience Engineering Theory},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2014},
}