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China's Emerging Civil Society: The Autonomy of NGOs in China

Brundenius, Peter (2005)
Department of Political Science
Abstract
In 1978 China initiated its policy of "reform and opening", and began thetransition from a planned to a market economy. Since then, the government has recognized the need for a private and voluntary sector to help deal with the socialconsequences of the market reforms. The government has consequently beentransferring some of its functions to an increasing number of so callednongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Some observers see this trend as evidence of an emerging civil society, and look at this development as in the endleading to democracy. Others are more pessimistic.This thesis examines this development and aims to explore the degree ofautonomy that this new group of Chinese NGOs enjoys in relation to the state. The result is... (More)
In 1978 China initiated its policy of "reform and opening", and began thetransition from a planned to a market economy. Since then, the government has recognized the need for a private and voluntary sector to help deal with the socialconsequences of the market reforms. The government has consequently beentransferring some of its functions to an increasing number of so callednongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Some observers see this trend as evidence of an emerging civil society, and look at this development as in the endleading to democracy. Others are more pessimistic.This thesis examines this development and aims to explore the degree ofautonomy that this new group of Chinese NGOs enjoys in relation to the state. The result is somewhat inconclusive. The Chinese society is becomingincreasingly pluralistic and new arenas for participation are opened up as the statewithdraws. At the same time, the government is still exercising a firm control onsociety and NGOs. Still, evidence suggests that there actually exists a larger space for autonomy than what might appear at a first glance. (Less)
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author
Brundenius, Peter
supervisor
organization
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
China, civil society, NGOs, autonomy, state-society relations, GONGOs, Political and administrative sciences, Statsvetenskap, förvaltningskunskap
language
English
id
1331553
date added to LUP
2005-06-20 00:00:00
date last changed
2005-06-20 00:00:00
@misc{1331553,
  abstract     = {In 1978 China initiated its policy of "reform and opening", and began thetransition from a planned to a market economy. Since then, the government has recognized the need for a private and voluntary sector to help deal with the socialconsequences of the market reforms. The government has consequently beentransferring some of its functions to an increasing number of so callednongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Some observers see this trend as evidence of an emerging civil society, and look at this development as in the endleading to democracy. Others are more pessimistic.This thesis examines this development and aims to explore the degree ofautonomy that this new group of Chinese NGOs enjoys in relation to the state. The result is somewhat inconclusive. The Chinese society is becomingincreasingly pluralistic and new arenas for participation are opened up as the statewithdraws. At the same time, the government is still exercising a firm control onsociety and NGOs. Still, evidence suggests that there actually exists a larger space for autonomy than what might appear at a first glance.},
  author       = {Brundenius, Peter},
  keyword      = {China,civil society,NGOs,autonomy,state-society relations,GONGOs,Political and administrative sciences,Statsvetenskap, förvaltningskunskap},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {China's Emerging Civil Society: The Autonomy of NGOs in China},
  year         = {2005},
}