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Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Adoption of Supercritical Technology in Coal Fired Thermal Power Plants in India

Chopra, Sonia LU (2009) IMEN56 20091
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract
In India, emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are increasing, due to the rise in energy demands to sustain economic growth. Coal is used as a dominant fuel in Indian thermal power plants, but the efficiency of these is low in comparison with prevailing international standards. As such, emissions of GHGs are much higher than is feasible to achieve. The adoption of Clean Coal Technologies (CCTs) – like the Supercritical (SC) steam cycle – for new capacity addition in Indian thermal power plants will increase the efficiency of the Indian grid. These technologies are more environmentally benign and would help meet increased energy demands. India has taken initiatives for the adoption of the technology, as explained in the 11th plan of the... (More)
In India, emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are increasing, due to the rise in energy demands to sustain economic growth. Coal is used as a dominant fuel in Indian thermal power plants, but the efficiency of these is low in comparison with prevailing international standards. As such, emissions of GHGs are much higher than is feasible to achieve. The adoption of Clean Coal Technologies (CCTs) – like the Supercritical (SC) steam cycle – for new capacity addition in Indian thermal power plants will increase the efficiency of the Indian grid. These technologies are more environmentally benign and would help meet increased energy demands. India has taken initiatives for the adoption of the technology, as explained in the 11th plan of the Planning Commission.
This thesis looks at the National Electricity Policy of India, and also reviews how coal power is useful for sustainable development. It further reviews technological growth of some of the CCTs which could be of relevance for the Indian power sector. Furthermore, it highlights the present status of Supercritical (SC) Technology in India. In addition, this study analysizes four hypothetical scenarios – in each five year plans until the 14th plan (2022-2027) – for Supercritical and Ultra Supercritical (USC) Technology penetration for coal based thermal power plants, and their impact on reducing GHGs emissions.
Finally, it is concluded from the study that SC and USC technology penetration would be helpful for reducing GHGs emissions. The hypothetical scenarios analysized showed that up to 50% technology penetration for new capacity addition until 2027 would be helpful for reducing GHGs emissions. Although the results showed that there is reduction in GHGs emissions, India needs a greater percentage of technology penetration in order to reduce emissions of GHGs. This technology penetration depends upon policy support. (Less)
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author
Chopra, Sonia LU
supervisor
organization
course
IMEN56 20091
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Greenhouse gases (GHGs), Clean Coal Technologies (CCTs), India, Technology
report number
2009:12
ISSN
1401-9191
language
English
id
1511108
date added to LUP
2009-11-26 13:36:30
date last changed
2009-11-26 13:36:30
@misc{1511108,
  abstract     = {In India, emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are increasing, due to the rise in energy demands to sustain economic growth. Coal is used as a dominant fuel in Indian thermal power plants, but the efficiency of these is low in comparison with prevailing international standards. As such, emissions of GHGs are much higher than is feasible to achieve. The adoption of Clean Coal Technologies (CCTs) – like the Supercritical (SC) steam cycle – for new capacity addition in Indian thermal power plants will increase the efficiency of the Indian grid. These technologies are more environmentally benign and would help meet increased energy demands. India has taken initiatives for the adoption of the technology, as explained in the 11th plan of the Planning Commission.
This thesis looks at the National Electricity Policy of India, and also reviews how coal power is useful for sustainable development. It further reviews technological growth of some of the CCTs which could be of relevance for the Indian power sector. Furthermore, it highlights the present status of Supercritical (SC) Technology in India. In addition, this study analysizes four hypothetical scenarios – in each five year plans until the 14th plan (2022-2027) – for Supercritical and Ultra Supercritical (USC) Technology penetration for coal based thermal power plants, and their impact on reducing GHGs emissions. 
Finally, it is concluded from the study that SC and USC technology penetration would be helpful for reducing GHGs emissions. The hypothetical scenarios analysized showed that up to 50% technology penetration for new capacity addition until 2027 would be helpful for reducing GHGs emissions. Although the results showed that there is reduction in GHGs emissions, India needs a greater percentage of technology penetration in order to reduce emissions of GHGs. This technology penetration depends upon policy support.},
  author       = {Chopra, Sonia},
  issn         = {1401-9191},
  keyword      = {Greenhouse gases (GHGs),Clean Coal Technologies (CCTs),India,Technology
},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Adoption of Supercritical Technology in Coal Fired Thermal Power Plants in India},
  year         = {2009},
}