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"[...] No One Teaches Another, Nor Anyone is Self-Taught. People Teach Each Other, Mediated by the World" (Freire, 1972:53). Transformative Adult Learning in New Social Movement. A Case Study from South Africa

Cubajevaite, Marta LU (2011) MIDM70 20111
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
New social movements in South Africa could play a prominent role in mobilizing the communities to reflect critically and address the repercussions of the neo-liberal agenda, i.e. perpetuating the exclusion of under-educated adults and provision of poor quality education.
Few studies especially from the perspective of the activists leave a potential research area of a very interesting phenomenon of how people learn while struggling for social justice. Therefore this single multi-site case study based on a social movement cohering around literacy issues in Gauteng, South Africa, aims at answering, what forms of learning and education the social movement encompassed, how did the group conscientization occur and what are the individual... (More)
New social movements in South Africa could play a prominent role in mobilizing the communities to reflect critically and address the repercussions of the neo-liberal agenda, i.e. perpetuating the exclusion of under-educated adults and provision of poor quality education.
Few studies especially from the perspective of the activists leave a potential research area of a very interesting phenomenon of how people learn while struggling for social justice. Therefore this single multi-site case study based on a social movement cohering around literacy issues in Gauteng, South Africa, aims at answering, what forms of learning and education the social movement encompassed, how did the group conscientization occur and what are the individual transformations.



Semi-structured interviews and a focus group discussion were held with 13 learners-activists and 2 adult educators. By applying Mezirow’s individual transformation and Freirean group conscientization models the analysis of primary and secondary data, revealed that the engagement in the social movement challenged and changed learners-activists’ understanding of educational status within their respective communities. This in turn led to transformative action addressing the problems identified. On the individual level some learners-activists became more tolerant and willing to cooperate with those of different political ideologies, able to tap into community resources. Finally, the potential of social movements as adult learning environments are outlined and directions for future research are offered. (Less)
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author
Cubajevaite, Marta LU
supervisor
organization
course
MIDM70 20111
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
1967025
date added to LUP
2011-09-14 11:33:08
date last changed
2013-06-18 12:56:09
@misc{1967025,
  abstract     = {New social movements in South Africa could play a prominent role in mobilizing the communities to reflect critically and address the repercussions of the neo-liberal agenda, i.e. perpetuating the exclusion of under-educated adults and provision of poor quality education.
Few studies especially from the perspective of the activists leave a potential research area of a very interesting phenomenon of how people learn while struggling for social justice. Therefore this single multi-site case study based on a social movement cohering around literacy issues in Gauteng, South Africa, aims at answering, what forms of learning and education the social movement encompassed, how did the group conscientization occur and what are the individual transformations.

 

Semi-structured interviews and a focus group discussion were held with 13 learners-activists and 2 adult educators. By applying Mezirow’s individual transformation and Freirean group conscientization models the analysis of primary and secondary data, revealed that the engagement in the social movement challenged and changed learners-activists’ understanding of educational status within their respective communities. This in turn led to transformative action addressing the problems identified. On the individual level some learners-activists became more tolerant and willing to cooperate with those of different political ideologies, able to tap into community resources. Finally, the potential of social movements as adult learning environments are outlined and directions for future research are offered.},
  author       = {Cubajevaite, Marta},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {"[...] No One Teaches Another, Nor Anyone is Self-Taught. People Teach Each Other, Mediated by the World" (Freire, 1972:53). Transformative Adult Learning in New Social Movement. A Case Study from South Africa},
  year         = {2011},
}