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Cufflinks versus Socks and Sandals - Authentic & Inauthentic Selves in a Post-Merger Organisation?

Egan-Wyer, Carys and Volkmer, Julia (2011)
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
Purpose: The main purpose of our research is to create interesting theoretical and practical insights rather than developing empirical generalisations about the experiences of employees from Prestige Consulting and BigTech regarding the merger and subsequent integration of the two organisations. Methodology (Empirical Foundation): The research is based on an empirically driven case study within the Management Consulting industry in the United Kingdom. The research was conducted from an interpretative perspective, using qualitative research methods. Theoretical Perspective: We examine existing literature on the multiplicity of identities, the relationship between organisational and individual identities as well as the perceptions of... (More)
Purpose: The main purpose of our research is to create interesting theoretical and practical insights rather than developing empirical generalisations about the experiences of employees from Prestige Consulting and BigTech regarding the merger and subsequent integration of the two organisations. Methodology (Empirical Foundation): The research is based on an empirically driven case study within the Management Consulting industry in the United Kingdom. The research was conducted from an interpretative perspective, using qualitative research methods. Theoretical Perspective: We examine existing literature on the multiplicity of identities, the relationship between organisational and individual identities as well as the perceptions of authentic/inauthentic selves. In light of our findings, we suggest the extension of existing theory to encompass our empirical context. Research Question: Why do some BigTech employees cling to their Prestige identities after nine years of ‘integration’ when their ways of working no longer reflect these identities? Basic Findings: Ex-Prestige consultants at BigTech describe two separate selves. A non-work self seems only to have developed since the merger with BigTech. Contrary to expectations they perceive the work self – which is strongly linked to the Prestige organisational identity - as more authentic and exhibit cynicism towards the non-work self. Strong prototypes of BigTech and Prestige employees help to maintain the distinction between the selves. Conclusion: The ex-Prestige consultants’ two separate selves each fulfil a different need for the consultant: the work-hard-play-hard (Prestige) self enhances the consultants’ self-esteem by providing continued association with a high-performing elite group and distinctiveness from their BigTech colleagues; the flesh-and-blood-family-oriented (BigTech) self allows the consultant a sense of belonging to a non-work group or family. (Less)
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author
Egan-Wyer, Carys and Volkmer, Julia
supervisor
organization
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Management Consulting, Clan, Identity, Organisational Identity, Control, Anti-Identity, Fantasy, Elite, Belongingness, Self-­‐Esteem, Appearance, Management of enterprises, Företagsledning, management
language
Swedish
id
1981853
date added to LUP
2011-06-01
date last changed
2012-04-02 19:06:39
@misc{1981853,
  abstract     = {Purpose: The main purpose of our research is to create interesting theoretical and practical insights rather than developing empirical generalisations about the experiences of employees from Prestige Consulting and BigTech regarding the merger and subsequent integration of the two organisations. Methodology (Empirical Foundation): The research is based on an empirically driven case study within the Management Consulting industry in the United Kingdom. The research was conducted from an interpretative perspective, using qualitative research methods. Theoretical Perspective: We examine existing literature on the multiplicity of identities, the relationship between organisational and individual identities as well as the perceptions of authentic/inauthentic selves. In light of our findings, we suggest the extension of existing theory to encompass our empirical context. Research Question: Why do some BigTech employees cling to their Prestige identities after nine years of ‘integration’ when their ways of working no longer reflect these identities? Basic Findings: Ex-Prestige consultants at BigTech describe two separate selves. A non-work self seems only to have developed since the merger with BigTech. Contrary to expectations they perceive the work self – which is strongly linked to the Prestige organisational identity - as more authentic and exhibit cynicism towards the non-work self. Strong prototypes of BigTech and Prestige employees help to maintain the distinction between the selves. Conclusion: The ex-Prestige consultants’ two separate selves each fulfil a different need for the consultant: the work-hard-play-hard (Prestige) self enhances the consultants’ self-esteem by providing continued association with a high-performing elite group and distinctiveness from their BigTech colleagues; the flesh-and-blood-family-oriented (BigTech) self allows the consultant a sense of belonging to a non-work group or family.},
  author       = {Egan-Wyer, Carys and Volkmer, Julia},
  keyword      = {Management Consulting,Clan,Identity,Organisational Identity,Control,Anti-Identity,Fantasy,Elite,Belongingness,Self-­‐Esteem,Appearance,Management of enterprises,Företagsledning, management},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Cufflinks versus Socks and Sandals - Authentic & Inauthentic Selves in a Post-Merger Organisation?},
  year         = {2011},
}