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Shareable Consumption - indications of a social collaborative lifestyle

Hammarberg, Kristoffer and Wong, Melinda (2011)
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
Thesis purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to explore the phenomenon of collaborative consumption through creating an understanding of why consumers engage in these consumption activities, and, if possible, relate their intentions to a shared collaborative lifestyle. Methodology:
A qualitative case study design has been applied and combined with netnographic observations and a focus group interview to explore the determining antecedents of consumers intention toward collaborative consumption. Conclusions could then be drawn through adapting a conceptual framework in combination with a qualitative grounded analysis to find commonalities that portray lifestyle choices. Theoretical perspective: The main theories that this study is based... (More)
Thesis purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to explore the phenomenon of collaborative consumption through creating an understanding of why consumers engage in these consumption activities, and, if possible, relate their intentions to a shared collaborative lifestyle. Methodology:
A qualitative case study design has been applied and combined with netnographic observations and a focus group interview to explore the determining antecedents of consumers intention toward collaborative consumption. Conclusions could then be drawn through adapting a conceptual framework in combination with a qualitative grounded analysis to find commonalities that portray lifestyle choices. Theoretical perspective: The main theories that this study is based upon refer to online communities, lifestyle and the determining antecedents of purchase intentions: motivation, trust, earlier experiences, perceived behavioral control and subjective norm. Empirical data:
Netnographic observations on ten online communities were combined with a focus group with six students who engage in collaborative activities. Conclusion:
The study revealed that people who engage in collaborative consumption activities share a common collective lifestyle in which usage is valued greater than ownership and the social dimension is important for trust to be built, as well as to socialize with other likeminded people about their shared interest. Their evaluation process is based on reputable factors that are gathered individually and collectively within the communities, thus forming a perceived communal control. (Less)
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author
Hammarberg, Kristoffer and Wong, Melinda
supervisor
organization
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Collaborative Consumption, Online Communities, Redistribution Market, Social Collaboration, Collaborative Lifestyle, Management of enterprises, Företagsledning, management
language
Swedish
id
1982640
date added to LUP
2011-06-01
date last changed
2012-04-02 18:52:36
@misc{1982640,
  abstract     = {Thesis purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to explore the phenomenon of collaborative consumption through creating an understanding of why consumers engage in these consumption activities, and, if possible, relate their intentions to a shared collaborative lifestyle. Methodology:
A qualitative case study design has been applied and combined with netnographic observations and a focus group interview to explore the determining antecedents of consumers intention toward collaborative consumption. Conclusions could then be drawn through adapting a conceptual framework in combination with a qualitative grounded analysis to find commonalities that portray lifestyle choices. Theoretical perspective: The main theories that this study is based upon refer to online communities, lifestyle and the determining antecedents of purchase intentions: motivation, trust, earlier experiences, perceived behavioral control and subjective norm. Empirical data:
Netnographic observations on ten online communities were combined with a focus group with six students who engage in collaborative activities. Conclusion:
The study revealed that people who engage in collaborative consumption activities share a common collective lifestyle in which usage is valued greater than ownership and the social dimension is important for trust to be built, as well as to socialize with other likeminded people about their shared interest. Their evaluation process is based on reputable factors that are gathered individually and collectively within the communities, thus forming a perceived communal control.},
  author       = {Hammarberg, Kristoffer and Wong, Melinda},
  keyword      = {Collaborative Consumption,Online Communities,Redistribution Market,Social Collaboration,Collaborative Lifestyle,Management of enterprises,Företagsledning, management},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Shareable Consumption - indications of a social collaborative lifestyle},
  year         = {2011},
}