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Theoretical Reflections and Business Plan

Heine, Koen (2011)
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
During the past year my academic career has been rather different than the years before. In my undergraduate studies of economics & business economics, a mixture of different disciplines like microeconomics, marketing, organizational theory and finance, all I needed to worry about was to make sure I would pass the courses. I found that a rather unsatisfying way of studying; grades didn’t motivate me very much and often the practical use of the theory was questionable. At times I thought the value of getting a degree consisted merely of that: getting a degree. Conversations with graduates taught me that they used the knowledge they acquired during their studies only to a limited extent. Perhaps then, a university education is not actually... (More)
During the past year my academic career has been rather different than the years before. In my undergraduate studies of economics & business economics, a mixture of different disciplines like microeconomics, marketing, organizational theory and finance, all I needed to worry about was to make sure I would pass the courses. I found that a rather unsatisfying way of studying; grades didn’t motivate me very much and often the practical use of the theory was questionable. At times I thought the value of getting a degree consisted merely of that: getting a degree. Conversations with graduates taught me that they used the knowledge they acquired during their studies only to a limited extent. Perhaps then, a university education is not actually an education but more like a series of tests that could signal to employers that the person holding a degree is intellectually capable. So I did my part and completed all the necessary courses, but for my graduate studies, I was keen on studying something else. Moreover, finding a job the traditional way like my classmates was not my first choice. Considering myself quite independently spirited, working on my own company was more alluring. The Entrepreneurship program at Lund University seemed to be a good choice. In the program, I could lay the foundations of my own company and proof to myself if I was really that capable as I thought I was. At this time of writing, that remains to be seen, but things don’t look all that unpromising. In this auto ethnographical document, I will take the reader through the different steps of the entrepreneurial process, and I will structure it with inspiration from the courses in this program as follows:
• Section I: The Entrepreneurial Process and Opportunity Recognition
• Section II: Resource Acquisition
• Section III: Entrepreneurial Marketing and Market Exploitation
• Section IV: Discussion
• Section V: Conclusion and Future Research
I will try to give an answer to the question of the usefulness of theories that we have learned in class. Is it merely academic or does it help one to become a better entrepreneur? (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Heine, Koen
supervisor
organization
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
management, Företagsledning, Management of enterprises
language
Swedish
id
2006975
date added to LUP
2011-06-03
date last changed
2012-11-12 11:38:02
@misc{2006975,
  abstract     = {During the past year my academic career has been rather different than the years before. In my undergraduate studies of economics & business economics, a mixture of different disciplines like microeconomics, marketing, organizational theory and finance, all I needed to worry about was to make sure I would pass the courses. I found that a rather unsatisfying way of studying; grades didn’t motivate me very much and often the practical use of the theory was questionable. At times I thought the value of getting a degree consisted merely of that: getting a degree. Conversations with graduates taught me that they used the knowledge they acquired during their studies only to a limited extent. Perhaps then, a university education is not actually an education but more like a series of tests that could signal to employers that the person holding a degree is intellectually capable. So I did my part and completed all the necessary courses, but for my graduate studies, I was keen on studying something else. Moreover, finding a job the traditional way like my classmates was not my first choice. Considering myself quite independently spirited, working on my own company was more alluring. The Entrepreneurship program at Lund University seemed to be a good choice. In the program, I could lay the foundations of my own company and proof to myself if I was really that capable as I thought I was. At this time of writing, that remains to be seen, but things don’t look all that unpromising. In this auto ethnographical document, I will take the reader through the different steps of the entrepreneurial process, and I will structure it with inspiration from the courses in this program as follows:
•	Section I: The Entrepreneurial Process and Opportunity Recognition
•	Section II: Resource Acquisition
•	Section III: Entrepreneurial Marketing and Market Exploitation
•	Section IV: Discussion
•	Section V: Conclusion and Future Research
I will try to give an answer to the question of the usefulness of theories that we have learned in class. Is it merely academic or does it help one to become a better entrepreneur?},
  author       = {Heine, Koen},
  keyword      = {management,Företagsledning,Management of enterprises},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Theoretical Reflections and Business Plan},
  year         = {2011},
}