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Inquiries into the absence of extended globular clusters in the Milky Way galaxy

Doxsee, Kristina LU (2010) In Lund Observatory Examensarbeten ASTK01 20091
Lund Observatory
Abstract
Thirteen stellar objects known as extended globular clusters were found in the Halo of the Andromeda Galaxy. Three of these extended clusters have quantitative properties which are subsequently used to determine whether clusters of extended size could survive in the orbits of the Milky Way Galaxy. The question of whether extended clusters could survive in the orbits of the Milky Way, is interesting to explore because Astronomers hypothesize that the existence of these rare objects is not restricted to M31. However, none have been found in the Milky Way to date; and it is the purpose of this report to begin to investigate whether this fact is indeed curious or whether there is a plausible explanation for why they are absent. Two major... (More)
Thirteen stellar objects known as extended globular clusters were found in the Halo of the Andromeda Galaxy. Three of these extended clusters have quantitative properties which are subsequently used to determine whether clusters of extended size could survive in the orbits of the Milky Way Galaxy. The question of whether extended clusters could survive in the orbits of the Milky Way, is interesting to explore because Astronomers hypothesize that the existence of these rare objects is not restricted to M31. However, none have been found in the Milky Way to date; and it is the purpose of this report to begin to investigate whether this fact is indeed curious or whether there is a plausible explanation for why they are absent. Two major factors affecting the likelihood of extended clusters surviving in the Milky Way Galaxy were investigated; namely, Tidal effects on the extended clusters in the orbits of the Milky Way; and the comparative cluster distribution of both Galaxies. The resulting data reveal that the cluster distribution in M31 favors the existence of extended globular clusters more than that of the Milky Way Galaxy; and that tidal shredding would play a prominent role in removing most of the extended clusters from the Milky Way, if they were present in the first place; however, despite the latter, a small fraction of extended clusters could still survive despite the tidal forces present in these orbits. (Less)
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author
Doxsee, Kristina LU
supervisor
organization
course
ASTK01 20091
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
publication/series
Lund Observatory Examensarbeten
report number
2010-EXA46
language
English
id
2172699
date added to LUP
2011-10-07 17:17:58
date last changed
2011-10-20 13:10:35
@misc{2172699,
  abstract     = {Thirteen stellar objects known as extended globular clusters were found in the Halo of the Andromeda Galaxy. Three of these extended clusters have quantitative properties which are subsequently used to determine whether clusters of extended size could survive in the orbits of the Milky Way Galaxy. The question of whether extended clusters could survive in the orbits of the Milky Way, is interesting to explore because Astronomers hypothesize that the existence of these rare objects is not restricted to M31. However, none have been found in the Milky Way to date; and it is the purpose of this report to begin to investigate whether this fact is indeed curious or whether there is a plausible explanation for why they are absent. Two major factors affecting the likelihood of extended clusters surviving in the Milky Way Galaxy were investigated; namely, Tidal effects on the extended clusters in the orbits of the Milky Way; and the comparative cluster distribution of both Galaxies. The resulting data reveal that the cluster distribution in M31 favors the existence of extended globular clusters more than that of the Milky Way Galaxy; and that tidal shredding would play a prominent role in removing most of the extended clusters from the Milky Way, if they were present in the first place; however, despite the latter, a small fraction of extended clusters could still survive despite the tidal forces present in these orbits.},
  author       = {Doxsee, Kristina},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Lund Observatory Examensarbeten},
  title        = {Inquiries into the absence of extended globular clusters in the Milky Way galaxy},
  year         = {2010},
}