Advanced

Exercising Responsibility in the Seafood Supply Chain: A Case Study on How a Retailer Implements its Commitment to Sustainable Seafood & Experiences of Other Seafood Buyers

Rogers, Emma LU (2011) In IIIEE Master Thesis IMEN41 20111
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract
The current status of overexploited fish stocks worldwide and increasing stakeholder expectations that retailers should responsibly source products have led to an increasing number of food retailers committing to sell sustainable seafood. Yet, the complexity and variety of seafood supply chains and the challenge inherent in the verification of sustainability qualities suggest that the implementation of these commitments can be difficult. The focus of this thesis is on understanding the approaches food retailers take to exercise responsibility over the sustainability of their seafood products. Insight into how food retailers implement their commitments, what factors shape their approach and the difficulties they perceive is intended to... (More)
The current status of overexploited fish stocks worldwide and increasing stakeholder expectations that retailers should responsibly source products have led to an increasing number of food retailers committing to sell sustainable seafood. Yet, the complexity and variety of seafood supply chains and the challenge inherent in the verification of sustainability qualities suggest that the implementation of these commitments can be difficult. The focus of this thesis is on understanding the approaches food retailers take to exercise responsibility over the sustainability of their seafood products. Insight into how food retailers implement their commitments, what factors shape their approach and the difficulties they perceive is intended to contribute a better understanding of how firms address environmental and/or social issues in supply chains. The research presents findings from a case study on a large Canadian food retailer and validates and contrasts the findings through interviews with other retailers and seafood suppliers. The analysis is based on a literature review of responsible sourcing and environmental supply management research, as well as multiple theoretical perspectives, including transaction cost economics, resource dependency theory and agency theory. The findings suggest that individual retailers use a number of approaches to exercise responsibility in the seafood supply chain as a result of external contextual factors associated with each product. Retailers also perceive challenges in the implementation of their commitments. Most common are that: mainstream end markets have not demonstrated the importance of the sustainability aspects in their purchasing habits; and, long, fragmented supply chains can make it difficult to verify the sustainability of the product. In turn, limited resources for retailers to select more sustainable products, work with suppliers to influence product qualities, and enhance supply chain control measures, can pose difficulties. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Rogers, Emma LU
supervisor
organization
course
IMEN41 20111
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
sustainable seafood, responsible sourcing, corporate social responsibility (CSR), interorganizational management
publication/series
IIIEE Master Thesis
report number
2011:29
ISSN
1401-9191
language
English
id
2174256
date added to LUP
2011-10-19 11:51:34
date last changed
2011-10-21 05:05:03
@misc{2174256,
  abstract     = {The current status of overexploited fish stocks worldwide and increasing stakeholder expectations that retailers should responsibly source products have led to an increasing number of food retailers committing to sell sustainable seafood. Yet, the complexity and variety of seafood supply chains and the challenge inherent in the verification of sustainability qualities suggest that the implementation of these commitments can be difficult. The focus of this thesis is on understanding the approaches food retailers take to exercise responsibility over the sustainability of their seafood products. Insight into how food retailers implement their commitments, what factors shape their approach and the difficulties they perceive is intended to contribute a better understanding of how firms address environmental and/or social issues in supply chains. The research presents findings from a case study on a large Canadian food retailer and validates and contrasts the findings through interviews with other retailers and seafood suppliers. The analysis is based on a literature review of responsible sourcing and environmental supply management research, as well as multiple theoretical perspectives, including transaction cost economics, resource dependency theory and agency theory. The findings suggest that individual retailers use a number of approaches to exercise responsibility in the seafood supply chain as a result of external contextual factors associated with each product. Retailers also perceive challenges in the implementation of their commitments. Most common are that: mainstream end markets have not demonstrated the importance of the sustainability aspects in their purchasing habits; and, long, fragmented supply chains can make it difficult to verify the sustainability of the product. In turn, limited resources for retailers to select more sustainable products, work with suppliers to influence product qualities, and enhance supply chain control measures, can pose difficulties.},
  author       = {Rogers, Emma},
  issn         = {1401-9191},
  keyword      = {sustainable seafood,responsible sourcing,corporate social responsibility (CSR),interorganizational management},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {IIIEE Master Thesis},
  title        = {Exercising Responsibility in the Seafood Supply Chain: A Case Study on How a Retailer Implements its Commitment to Sustainable Seafood & Experiences of Other Seafood Buyers},
  year         = {2011},
}