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Interpreting in 3D - Employing 3D modeling in field archaeology from research and public communication perspectives

Ask, Carolina LU (2012) ARKM21 20121
Archaeology
Abstract
This thesis investigates the use of digital technology on the border between science and public communication. The author argues for a public archaeology that goes beyond an arranged communication, where only one final truth about the past is presented. Instead arguments are presented for the benefit of letting also non-archaeologists take part of the many ambiguities of archaeological excavations, thus experiencing the process in which knowledge about the past is created. The potentials in using 3D modeling as a way that involve the public in the interpretation process, and at the same time provide researchers with a deeper understanding of the archaeological context is investigated and discussed in this thesis. An experiment of 3D... (More)
This thesis investigates the use of digital technology on the border between science and public communication. The author argues for a public archaeology that goes beyond an arranged communication, where only one final truth about the past is presented. Instead arguments are presented for the benefit of letting also non-archaeologists take part of the many ambiguities of archaeological excavations, thus experiencing the process in which knowledge about the past is created. The potentials in using 3D modeling as a way that involve the public in the interpretation process, and at the same time provide researchers with a deeper understanding of the archaeological context is investigated and discussed in this thesis. An experiment of 3D visualization of an archaeological excavation is developed where 3D models representing the excavation area obtained through Computer Vision techniques are combined with modeled 3D geometry representing archaeological interpretations made during and after the excavation. The layout of the models of combined 3D data describes the relation between archaeological features and interpretations of what they represent, which in a communication situation gives the public the chance to follow the reasoning of the archaeologists. From a research perspective, integrating the element of hypothesis visualization in the fieldwork process, provides a deeper understanding of an archaeological context, beneficial for the continuing excavation process. The case study was conducted using a systemized way of accounting for sources and paradata, being the record of the subjective discussions, decisions and choices made that leading to the visualization, thus emphasizing the importance of transparency in virtual heritage. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Ask, Carolina LU
supervisor
organization
course
ARKM21 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
3D modeling, visualization, model, reconstruction, field archaeology, public archaeology, computer vision, digital archaeology, virtual reality, virtual heritage, transparency, paradata, contextual experiment
language
English
id
2543931
date added to LUP
2012-06-19 08:37:58
date last changed
2012-06-19 08:37:58
@misc{2543931,
  abstract     = {This thesis investigates the use of digital technology on the border between science and public communication. The author argues for a public archaeology that goes beyond an arranged communication, where only one final truth about the past is presented. Instead arguments are presented for the benefit of letting also non-archaeologists take part of the many ambiguities of archaeological excavations, thus experiencing the process in which knowledge about the past is created. The potentials in using 3D modeling as a way that involve the public in the interpretation process, and at the same time provide researchers with a deeper understanding of the archaeological context is investigated and discussed in this thesis. An experiment of 3D visualization of an archaeological excavation is developed where 3D models representing the excavation area obtained through Computer Vision techniques are combined with modeled 3D geometry representing archaeological interpretations made during and after the excavation. The layout of the models of combined 3D data describes the relation between archaeological features and interpretations of what they represent, which in a communication situation gives the public the chance to follow the reasoning of the archaeologists. From a research perspective, integrating the element of hypothesis visualization in the fieldwork process, provides a deeper understanding of an archaeological context, beneficial for the continuing excavation process. The case study was conducted using a systemized way of accounting for sources and paradata, being the record of the subjective discussions, decisions and choices made that leading to the visualization, thus emphasizing the importance of transparency in virtual heritage.},
  author       = {Ask, Carolina},
  keyword      = {3D modeling,visualization,model,reconstruction,field archaeology,public archaeology,computer vision,digital archaeology,virtual reality,virtual heritage,transparency,paradata,contextual experiment},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Interpreting in 3D - Employing 3D modeling in field archaeology from research and public communication perspectives},
  year         = {2012},
}