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Meaning and usage variation of feminine and womanly in American literary history. A corpus based case study

Ferm, Lavinia LU (2011) ENGK01 20111
English Studies
Abstract
The original aim for this case study was to look at how two synonymous
lexemes, feminine and womanly, have varied in meaning over time in both
British and American literature and also, to see if there was a difference in
the usage of the lexemes depending on whether the author was male or
female. As can be read in Lyons (1995: 60), lexemes like feminine and
womanly would be called near-synonyms in linguistic semantics, which
means that they are very similar but not entirely identical in meaning. This
particular difference is what this study will try to discover.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Ferm, Lavinia LU
supervisor
organization
course
ENGK01 20111
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
language
English
id
2760404
date added to LUP
2012-06-12 15:00:16
date last changed
2012-06-12 15:00:16
@misc{2760404,
  abstract     = {The original aim for this case study was to look at how two synonymous
lexemes, feminine and womanly, have varied in meaning over time in both
British and American literature and also, to see if there was a difference in
the usage of the lexemes depending on whether the author was male or
female. As can be read in Lyons (1995: 60), lexemes like feminine and
womanly would be called near-synonyms in linguistic semantics, which
means that they are very similar but not entirely identical in meaning. This
particular difference is what this study will try to discover.},
  author       = {Ferm, Lavinia},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Meaning and usage variation of feminine and womanly in American literary history. A corpus based case study},
  year         = {2011},
}