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Household Waste Collection Policies for Mercury-Containing Light Sources in Sweden: Status and Trends

Sipka, Stefan LU (2012) In IIIEE Master thesis IMEN56 20121
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract
The thesis explores the possibilities of the Swedish government to assure effective waste collection policies for mercury-containing gas-discharge lamps (GDL) in the context of phase-out of incandescent light bulbs. The study includes review of the waste collection, the waste collection evaluation, policy review and policy analysis. The specific analytical tools applied include Lindhqvist’s policy principle of extended producer responsibility (EPR), Melissen’s Morphological chart and Wagner’s convenience factor. Main waste collection forms consisted of municipal recycling centers, mobile collection points in rural areas, curbside collection, collection vehicle with fixed collection position and collection in store which is mainly in... (More)
The thesis explores the possibilities of the Swedish government to assure effective waste collection policies for mercury-containing gas-discharge lamps (GDL) in the context of phase-out of incandescent light bulbs. The study includes review of the waste collection, the waste collection evaluation, policy review and policy analysis. The specific analytical tools applied include Lindhqvist’s policy principle of extended producer responsibility (EPR), Melissen’s Morphological chart and Wagner’s convenience factor. Main waste collection forms consisted of municipal recycling centers, mobile collection points in rural areas, curbside collection, collection vehicle with fixed collection position and collection in store which is mainly in experimental phase. The results showed low GDL waste collection effectiveness and unclear estimations regarding collection rates. Key policy elements in Sweden were included in the Ordinance SFS 2005:209 and the Waste Ordinance SFS 2011:927. Ordinance 2005:209 transposed the EU Directive for waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE Directive) which strongly influenced the Ordinance SFS 2005:209. Both WEEE Directive and the Ordinance SFS 2005:209 introduced weight-based collection targets for the whole WEEE and limited producer responsibility for waste collection. Ordinance SFS 2005:209 did not transpose distributor responsibility. Main current policy limitations include lack of specific collection rates, unclear specification of responsibility for the collection of household waste and a lack of distributor responsibility. Further policy improvements might include deposit-refund system, financial and/or physical extension of producer responsibility to household waste collection and introducing liability of producers for the unsorted waste. (Less)
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author
Sipka, Stefan LU
supervisor
organization
course
IMEN56 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Sweden, mercury, light source, policy, waste collection, household
publication/series
IIIEE Master thesis
report number
2012:12
ISSN
1401-9191
language
English
id
3126081
date added to LUP
2012-10-04 14:44:03
date last changed
2012-10-04 14:44:03
@misc{3126081,
  abstract     = {The thesis explores the possibilities of the Swedish government to assure effective waste collection policies for mercury-containing gas-discharge lamps (GDL) in the context of phase-out of incandescent light bulbs. The study includes review of the waste collection, the waste collection evaluation, policy review and policy analysis. The specific analytical tools applied include Lindhqvist’s policy principle of extended producer responsibility (EPR), Melissen’s Morphological chart and Wagner’s convenience factor. Main waste collection forms consisted of municipal recycling centers, mobile collection points in rural areas, curbside collection, collection vehicle with fixed collection position and collection in store which is mainly in experimental phase. The results showed low GDL waste collection effectiveness and unclear estimations regarding collection rates. Key policy elements in Sweden were included in the Ordinance SFS 2005:209 and the Waste Ordinance SFS 2011:927. Ordinance 2005:209 transposed the EU Directive for waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE Directive) which strongly influenced the Ordinance SFS 2005:209. Both WEEE Directive and the Ordinance SFS 2005:209 introduced weight-based collection targets for the whole WEEE and limited producer responsibility for waste collection. Ordinance SFS 2005:209 did not transpose distributor responsibility. Main current policy limitations include lack of specific collection rates, unclear specification of responsibility for the collection of household waste and a lack of distributor responsibility. Further policy improvements might include deposit-refund system, financial and/or physical extension of producer responsibility to household waste collection and introducing liability of producers for the unsorted waste.},
  author       = {Sipka, Stefan},
  issn         = {1401-9191},
  keyword      = {Sweden,mercury,light source,policy,waste collection,household},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {IIIEE Master thesis},
  title        = {Household Waste Collection Policies for Mercury-Containing Light Sources in Sweden: Status and Trends},
  year         = {2012},
}