Advanced

Local Seafood Movements and Seafood Sustainability in North America: A case study on a community supported fishery in Monterey, California

Witter, Allison Louisa LU (2012) In IIIEE Master thesis IMEN56 20121
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract
Local seafood movements have recently emerged in North America with the aims of
enhancing connections between fishermen and consumers, towards improved environmental,
economic, and social sustainability. Community supported fisheries (CSFs), in particular, have
arisen as a new business model for linking seafood producers to local markets. However, little
research has been carried out on the likely impacts of such models as of yet.
The aim of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of how CSFs may fill gaps left
behind by public regulation (fisheries policy) and private regulation (sustainable seafood
initiatives) towards improved seafood sustainability. The specific steps that CSFs envision
taking in order to reach... (More)
Local seafood movements have recently emerged in North America with the aims of
enhancing connections between fishermen and consumers, towards improved environmental,
economic, and social sustainability. Community supported fisheries (CSFs), in particular, have
arisen as a new business model for linking seafood producers to local markets. However, little
research has been carried out on the likely impacts of such models as of yet.
The aim of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of how CSFs may fill gaps left
behind by public regulation (fisheries policy) and private regulation (sustainable seafood
initiatives) towards improved seafood sustainability. The specific steps that CSFs envision
taking in order to reach their end goals is articulated, through formulation of a basic program
theory for CSFs. Practical application of these steps, or intermediate outcomes, is measured
through case study analysis of the Local Catch Monterey Bay (LCMB) CSF in California.
Findings suggest that the CSF is already achieving five out of the eight intermediate outcomes.
Uncertainties surrounding time frames, scale, and cause-effect linkages, however, make
LCMB’s subsequent potential to reach the end goals of CSF program theory unknown.
A set of key supply-side and demand-side challenges and drivers has been extracted from the
case study, as well as from data gathered on other North American CSFs. In addition,
important lessons for CSFs have been drawn, including the need to recognize the importance
of (1) the differences between the sustainable seafood and local seafood movements, (2)
specific contextual factors associated with CSFs, and (3) applying socio-economic
considerations to fisheries policy and sustainable seafood initiatives. Overall, the need to
further explore varying definitions of ‘local’ and ‘sustainable’, as well as the potential
applicability of the CSF model internationally, remain pertinent. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Witter, Allison Louisa LU
supervisor
organization
course
IMEN56 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Sustainable seafood, local seafood movements, community supported fisheries (CSFs), program theory, Monterey Bay
publication/series
IIIEE Master thesis
report number
2012:15
ISSN
1401-9191
language
English
id
3126197
date added to LUP
2012-10-04 14:43:38
date last changed
2012-10-04 14:43:38
@misc{3126197,
  abstract     = {Local seafood movements have recently emerged in North America with the aims of
enhancing connections between fishermen and consumers, towards improved environmental,
economic, and social sustainability. Community supported fisheries (CSFs), in particular, have
arisen as a new business model for linking seafood producers to local markets. However, little
research has been carried out on the likely impacts of such models as of yet.
The aim of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of how CSFs may fill gaps left
behind by public regulation (fisheries policy) and private regulation (sustainable seafood
initiatives) towards improved seafood sustainability. The specific steps that CSFs envision
taking in order to reach their end goals is articulated, through formulation of a basic program
theory for CSFs. Practical application of these steps, or intermediate outcomes, is measured
through case study analysis of the Local Catch Monterey Bay (LCMB) CSF in California.
Findings suggest that the CSF is already achieving five out of the eight intermediate outcomes.
Uncertainties surrounding time frames, scale, and cause-effect linkages, however, make
LCMB’s subsequent potential to reach the end goals of CSF program theory unknown.
A set of key supply-side and demand-side challenges and drivers has been extracted from the
case study, as well as from data gathered on other North American CSFs. In addition,
important lessons for CSFs have been drawn, including the need to recognize the importance
of (1) the differences between the sustainable seafood and local seafood movements, (2)
specific contextual factors associated with CSFs, and (3) applying socio-economic
considerations to fisheries policy and sustainable seafood initiatives. Overall, the need to
further explore varying definitions of ‘local’ and ‘sustainable’, as well as the potential
applicability of the CSF model internationally, remain pertinent.},
  author       = {Witter, Allison Louisa},
  issn         = {1401-9191},
  keyword      = {Sustainable seafood,local seafood movements,community supported fisheries (CSFs),program theory,Monterey Bay},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {IIIEE Master thesis},
  title        = {Local Seafood Movements and Seafood Sustainability in North America: A case study on a community supported fishery in Monterey, California},
  year         = {2012},
}