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Being Authentic and Feeling Understood: A Structural Equation Model of the Relationship between Expressive Suppression and Social Outcomes

Koppel, Lina LU (2015) PSYP01 20142
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Previous research has shown that hiding one’s emotions, an emotion-regulation strategy known as expressive suppression (Gross, 1998a), leads to adverse social outcomes. The underlying mechanisms that explain this relationship are not yet fully understood. The present study developed and tested a structural equation model with two mediators (authenticity and feeling understood) and two moderators (attachment and gender). 405 participants completed a set of online questionnaires that assessed individual differences in expressive suppression, authenticity, feeling understood, attachment styles, and social outcomes. Suppression was negatively correlated with social satisfaction, social support, and friendship, and positively correlated with... (More)
Previous research has shown that hiding one’s emotions, an emotion-regulation strategy known as expressive suppression (Gross, 1998a), leads to adverse social outcomes. The underlying mechanisms that explain this relationship are not yet fully understood. The present study developed and tested a structural equation model with two mediators (authenticity and feeling understood) and two moderators (attachment and gender). 405 participants completed a set of online questionnaires that assessed individual differences in expressive suppression, authenticity, feeling understood, attachment styles, and social outcomes. Suppression was negatively correlated with social satisfaction, social support, and friendship, and positively correlated with loneliness. These associations were mediated by authenticity and feeling understood, suggesting that individuals who habitually suppress their emotions experience adverse social outcomes because they feel inauthentic in their social interactions, which in turn makes them feel poorly understood by others. Feeling understood was a particularly powerful mediator among women, whereas the relationship between suppression and social outcomes was mostly mediated by authenticity in men. Attachment did not moderate the relationship between suppression and social outcomes, which indicates that suppression has a negative effect on social outcomes regardless of an individual’s attachment style. The study is the first to suggest that expressive suppression is associated with feeling poorly understood and that the mechanism underlying the relationship between suppression and social outcomes differs between men and women. (Less)
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author
Koppel, Lina LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP01 20142
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
emotion regulation, expressive suppression, authenticity, feeling understood, social outcomes, attachment
language
English
id
4940097
date added to LUP
2015-02-09 09:29:22
date last changed
2015-03-27 08:42:57
@misc{4940097,
  abstract     = {Previous research has shown that hiding one’s emotions, an emotion-regulation strategy known as expressive suppression (Gross, 1998a), leads to adverse social outcomes. The underlying mechanisms that explain this relationship are not yet fully understood. The present study developed and tested a structural equation model with two mediators (authenticity and feeling understood) and two moderators (attachment and gender). 405 participants completed a set of online questionnaires that assessed individual differences in expressive suppression, authenticity, feeling understood, attachment styles, and social outcomes. Suppression was negatively correlated with social satisfaction, social support, and friendship, and positively correlated with loneliness. These associations were mediated by authenticity and feeling understood, suggesting that individuals who habitually suppress their emotions experience adverse social outcomes because they feel inauthentic in their social interactions, which in turn makes them feel poorly understood by others. Feeling understood was a particularly powerful mediator among women, whereas the relationship between suppression and social outcomes was mostly mediated by authenticity in men. Attachment did not moderate the relationship between suppression and social outcomes, which indicates that suppression has a negative effect on social outcomes regardless of an individual’s attachment style. The study is the first to suggest that expressive suppression is associated with feeling poorly understood and that the mechanism underlying the relationship between suppression and social outcomes differs between men and women.},
  author       = {Koppel, Lina},
  keyword      = {emotion regulation,expressive suppression,authenticity,feeling understood,social outcomes,attachment},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Being Authentic and Feeling Understood: A Structural Equation Model of the Relationship between Expressive Suppression and Social Outcomes},
  year         = {2015},
}