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Let the Right One In - On the Market

Erlandsson, Ludvig LU ; Uggla, Helena and Lindell, Viktor (2015) FEKH19 20151
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
Purpose: Examine to what extent present-day strategic decision-makers are aware of and
apply Porter’s theory of structural barriers to entry during entry on new markets. Another
purpose is to present whether there are any other structural barriers to entry that strategic
decision-makers consider in practice.

Methodology: The study is a qualitative cross-sectional study in which we have conducted
semi-structured interviews. The data we have collected has been analyzed using pattern
matching.

Theoretical perspectives: Michael Porter’s five forces framework, in which he presented
barriers to entry as a factor that affects the competition on a market, is used as a foundation
for the study. Barriers to entry can be anything that... (More)
Purpose: Examine to what extent present-day strategic decision-makers are aware of and
apply Porter’s theory of structural barriers to entry during entry on new markets. Another
purpose is to present whether there are any other structural barriers to entry that strategic
decision-makers consider in practice.

Methodology: The study is a qualitative cross-sectional study in which we have conducted
semi-structured interviews. The data we have collected has been analyzed using pattern
matching.

Theoretical perspectives: Michael Porter’s five forces framework, in which he presented
barriers to entry as a factor that affects the competition on a market, is used as a foundation
for the study. Barriers to entry can be anything that hinders or deters new actors from entering
a market.

Empirical foundation: Interviews have been conducted with seven individuals, the majority
being strategy consultants, who have experiences regarding how strategic decision-makers
reason during entries into new markets.

Conclusions: Our research indicates that strategic decision-makers are aware of four, and
apply two of Porter’s six structural barriers to entry during entries onto new markets to a
fairly large extent. However, the data we have collected suggests that it is rarely because they
are aware of Porter’s theory of barriers to entry but rather that they understand that there may
be obstacles. They understand that they need to overcome these when entering new markets.

There are other structural barriers to entry that strategic decision-makers also take into
consideration during entries. These are cultural differences and access to labor (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Erlandsson, Ludvig LU ; Uggla, Helena and Lindell, Viktor
supervisor
organization
course
FEKH19 20151
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Structural Barriers to Entry, Market Entry, Strategic Decision-makers, Strategy Consultants and Michael Porter
language
Swedish
id
7456372
date added to LUP
2015-07-02 11:35:47
date last changed
2015-07-02 11:35:47
@misc{7456372,
  abstract     = {Purpose: Examine to what extent present-day strategic decision-makers are aware of and
apply Porter’s theory of structural barriers to entry during entry on new markets. Another
purpose is to present whether there are any other structural barriers to entry that strategic
decision-makers consider in practice.

Methodology: The study is a qualitative cross-sectional study in which we have conducted
semi-structured interviews. The data we have collected has been analyzed using pattern
matching.

Theoretical perspectives: Michael Porter’s five forces framework, in which he presented
barriers to entry as a factor that affects the competition on a market, is used as a foundation
for the study. Barriers to entry can be anything that hinders or deters new actors from entering
a market.

Empirical foundation: Interviews have been conducted with seven individuals, the majority
being strategy consultants, who have experiences regarding how strategic decision-makers
reason during entries into new markets.

Conclusions: Our research indicates that strategic decision-makers are aware of four, and
apply two of Porter’s six structural barriers to entry during entries onto new markets to a
fairly large extent. However, the data we have collected suggests that it is rarely because they
are aware of Porter’s theory of barriers to entry but rather that they understand that there may
be obstacles. They understand that they need to overcome these when entering new markets.

There are other structural barriers to entry that strategic decision-makers also take into
consideration during entries. These are cultural differences and access to labor},
  author       = {Erlandsson, Ludvig and Uggla, Helena and Lindell, Viktor},
  keyword      = {Structural Barriers to Entry,Market Entry,Strategic Decision-makers,Strategy Consultants and Michael Porter},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Let the Right One In - On the Market},
  year         = {2015},
}