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Depressed Fathers: Risk Factors for Paternal Depression Within the First 18 Months of a Child’s Life

Eichbichler, Anna LU (2015) PSYP01 20151
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Positive aspects of fathers’ involvement in parenting are broadly recognized, but challenges faced by fathers are often neglected and postpartum depression (PPD) is still mainly considered as a problem of mothers. Yet, new evidence suggests a similar prevalence of about 10 % in fathers and mothers. The present study investigated paternal PPD, its character and its links to attachment styles, parenting stress, relational, masculinity and socio-demographic variables. 530 men who became fathers within the last 18 months participated in an online survey. 27 % of the fathers were classified as depressed with the BDI-II. Hierarchical multiple regression (HMR) analyses indicated that depressive symptoms in fathers were associated with parenting... (More)
Positive aspects of fathers’ involvement in parenting are broadly recognized, but challenges faced by fathers are often neglected and postpartum depression (PPD) is still mainly considered as a problem of mothers. Yet, new evidence suggests a similar prevalence of about 10 % in fathers and mothers. The present study investigated paternal PPD, its character and its links to attachment styles, parenting stress, relational, masculinity and socio-demographic variables. 530 men who became fathers within the last 18 months participated in an online survey. 27 % of the fathers were classified as depressed with the BDI-II. Hierarchical multiple regression (HMR) analyses indicated that depressive symptoms in fathers were associated with parenting stress (incompetence and role restriction), attachment anxiety, lower consensus with their partners, conformity to masculinity, and their partners' poor mental health post-partum. Additionally, structural equation modelling (SEM) revealed significant indirect (mediating) effects between attachment anxiety and PPD via incompetence and role restriction. Relationship satisfaction and attachment avoidance were not related to paternal PPD in this study. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms associated with the occurrence and maintenance of paternal PPD, providing knowledge that can be used for a better inclusion of fathers in prevention and parenting programs as well as for building suitable interventions for PPD; highlighting the importance of addressing the couple as entity in the context of parenthood. Keywords: depression, paternal postpartum depression, postnatal, fathers, parenting stress, attachment, dyadic consensus, masculinity (Less)
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author
Eichbichler, Anna LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP01 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
depression, paternal postpartum depression, postnatal, fathers, parenting stress, attachment, dyadic consensus, masculinity
language
English
id
7860244
date added to LUP
2015-09-07 16:00:43
date last changed
2015-09-07 16:00:43
@misc{7860244,
  abstract     = {Positive aspects of fathers’ involvement in parenting are broadly recognized, but challenges faced by fathers are often neglected and postpartum depression (PPD) is still mainly considered as a problem of mothers. Yet, new evidence suggests a similar prevalence of about 10 % in fathers and mothers. The present study investigated paternal PPD, its character and its links to attachment styles, parenting stress, relational, masculinity and socio-demographic variables. 530 men who became fathers within the last 18 months participated in an online survey. 27 % of the fathers were classified as depressed with the BDI-II. Hierarchical multiple regression (HMR) analyses indicated that depressive symptoms in fathers were associated with parenting stress (incompetence and role restriction), attachment anxiety, lower consensus with their partners, conformity to masculinity, and their partners' poor mental health post-partum. Additionally, structural equation modelling (SEM) revealed significant indirect (mediating) effects between attachment anxiety and PPD via incompetence and role restriction. Relationship satisfaction and attachment avoidance were not related to paternal PPD in this study. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms associated with the occurrence and maintenance of paternal PPD, providing knowledge that can be used for a better inclusion of fathers in prevention and parenting programs as well as for building suitable interventions for PPD; highlighting the importance of addressing the couple as entity in the context of parenthood.						 Keywords: depression, paternal postpartum depression, postnatal, fathers, parenting stress, attachment, dyadic consensus, masculinity},
  author       = {Eichbichler, Anna},
  keyword      = {depression,paternal postpartum depression,postnatal,fathers,parenting stress,attachment,dyadic consensus,masculinity},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Depressed Fathers: Risk Factors for Paternal Depression Within the First 18 Months of a Child’s Life},
  year         = {2015},
}