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Taste Masking in Pickering Emulsions

Knopp, Nathalie LU (2015) KLGM01 20142
Food Technology and Nutrition (M.Sc.)
Abstract
Taste masking is an important aspect in the food industry. Many health beneficial foods contain compounds such as phytochemicals that have undesireable tastes. The aim of this work was to prepare particle-stabilised (Pickering) emulsions to encapsulate and mask the taste of strong flavoured oil using heat-treatment.
Quinoa starch Pickering emulsions made with a neutral oil (miglyol), fish oil and olive oil and were characterised. It was shown that miglyol required higher amounts of starch (400 µg/g oil) to emulsify all oil, compared to fish oil and olive oil (less than 100 µg oil). An increased particle sizes of olive oil Pickering emulsions after 24 hours indicated coagulation or coalescence.
Conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid... (More)
Taste masking is an important aspect in the food industry. Many health beneficial foods contain compounds such as phytochemicals that have undesireable tastes. The aim of this work was to prepare particle-stabilised (Pickering) emulsions to encapsulate and mask the taste of strong flavoured oil using heat-treatment.
Quinoa starch Pickering emulsions made with a neutral oil (miglyol), fish oil and olive oil and were characterised. It was shown that miglyol required higher amounts of starch (400 µg/g oil) to emulsify all oil, compared to fish oil and olive oil (less than 100 µg oil). An increased particle sizes of olive oil Pickering emulsions after 24 hours indicated coagulation or coalescence.
Conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) of non-heat-treated, heat-treated Pickering emulsions and Tween 20 emulsions with fish and olive oil were measured to study the lipid oxidation over seven days. Comparing trends, heat-treated Pickering emulsions showed less oxidation increase than Tween 20-stabilised and non-heat treated Pickering emulsions.
A sensory analysis of olive oil Pickering emulsion showed a threshold value of approximately 10%, above which olive oil can be tasted. In a subsequent sensory evaluation significant difference between the heat-treated Pickering emulsions, gum-stabilised and non-heat treated Pickering emulsions were detected. This confirms the hypothesis that encapsulation in Pickering emulsion provides a barrier that is able to mask the taste of strongly flavoured oil and shows a potential future use for food fortification with fish oil. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Oils that contain healthy omega fatty acids can have a strong flavour and undesirable taste. The aim of the project to mask the taste of oils in emulsions was successfully achieved. Up to 10% of strong-flavoured olive oil can be added to an emulsion before the olive taste is detectable, which could have great impact on human health.

In this project, particle stabilised emulsions, Pickering emulsions, were created by dispersing oil in water. Intact starch granules cover the oil droplets and stabilise the emulsion by forming a barrier that prevents the separation of the oil and water phases. Heating the Pickering emulsion enhances the barrier and leads to the formation of a capsule, as the starch granules partially gelatinise and form a... (More)
Oils that contain healthy omega fatty acids can have a strong flavour and undesirable taste. The aim of the project to mask the taste of oils in emulsions was successfully achieved. Up to 10% of strong-flavoured olive oil can be added to an emulsion before the olive taste is detectable, which could have great impact on human health.

In this project, particle stabilised emulsions, Pickering emulsions, were created by dispersing oil in water. Intact starch granules cover the oil droplets and stabilise the emulsion by forming a barrier that prevents the separation of the oil and water phases. Heating the Pickering emulsion enhances the barrier and leads to the formation of a capsule, as the starch granules partially gelatinise and form a continuous layer around the oil droplets.
The starch was obtained from the quinoa grain, which is a natural, sustainable and gluten-free pseudo-cereal.

The sensory analysis revealed that the Pickering emulsion with the heat encapsulated olive oil exhibits a significant taste-masking effect, compared to pure olive oil, non-heat-treated Pickering emulsion and a emulsion stabilised with gum arabic. This shows that the heat-treatment of starch Pickering emulsions is an effective method to reduce the taste of oils. To test the encapsulation efficiency, the lipid oxidation in the emulsion was measured. Lipid oxidation occurs when the oil is exposed to air. In a chain reaction, the oils are degraded and become rancid. The observed results indicate that the heat-treated Pickering emulsion had oxidised the least. That finding suggests that the encapsulation provides a more efficient barrier and is therefore less exposed to oxygen. However, the due to problems in the lipid oxidation method the results remain inconclusive.

The ability to mask the taste of oils in emulsions has a great potential for application in food products. Fish oil contains health beneficial omega-3 fatty acids that can only be obtained by eating fatty fish. Fortification of everyday products, such as margarine with fish oil can increase the amount of omega-3 fatty acids taken up and lead to a healthier brain and healthier heart- all without the taste of fish. (Less)
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author
Knopp, Nathalie LU
supervisor
organization
course
KLGM01 20142
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
7865018
date added to LUP
2019-04-08 15:52:44
date last changed
2019-04-08 15:52:44
@misc{7865018,
  abstract     = {Taste masking is an important aspect in the food industry. Many health beneficial foods contain compounds such as phytochemicals that have undesireable tastes. The aim of this work was to prepare particle-stabilised (Pickering) emulsions to encapsulate and mask the taste of strong flavoured oil using heat-treatment.
Quinoa starch Pickering emulsions made with a neutral oil (miglyol), fish oil and olive oil and were characterised. It was shown that miglyol required higher amounts of starch (400 µg/g oil) to emulsify all oil, compared to fish oil and olive oil (less than 100 µg oil). An increased particle sizes of olive oil Pickering emulsions after 24 hours indicated coagulation or coalescence.
Conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) of non-heat-treated, heat-treated Pickering emulsions and Tween 20 emulsions with fish and olive oil were measured to study the lipid oxidation over seven days. Comparing trends, heat-treated Pickering emulsions showed less oxidation increase than Tween 20-stabilised and non-heat treated Pickering emulsions.
A sensory analysis of olive oil Pickering emulsion showed a threshold value of approximately 10%, above which olive oil can be tasted. In a subsequent sensory evaluation significant difference between the heat-treated Pickering emulsions, gum-stabilised and non-heat treated Pickering emulsions were detected. This confirms the hypothesis that encapsulation in Pickering emulsion provides a barrier that is able to mask the taste of strongly flavoured oil and shows a potential future use for food fortification with fish oil.},
  author       = {Knopp, Nathalie},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Taste Masking in Pickering Emulsions},
  year         = {2015},
}