Advanced

The Reasoning on Brand Equity Dimensions: Why or Why Not Young Adults Change Their Company Evaluation After CSR and Irresponsible Business Practice Information Input.

Joham, Lionel LU and Knechtel, Jan LU (2015) BUSN39 20151
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
Irresponsible Business Practices (IBPs) form the counterpart of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). While the latter represents a very popular field of research, IBPs are still under- researched especially when both factors are put into context. In the furniture retail industry, IBPs are a rather recent subject in production process and supplier relationships. As the purpose of CSR is not to compromise future generations’ needs, the interesting question is how young adults manoeuvre within the area of conflict of IBPs and CSR. Several studies suggest that the young adults’ expectations for companies to act ethically has risen. Nevertheless, it is unclear how CSR in the context of IBPs affects young adults’ reasoning (and consequently... (More)
Irresponsible Business Practices (IBPs) form the counterpart of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). While the latter represents a very popular field of research, IBPs are still under- researched especially when both factors are put into context. In the furniture retail industry, IBPs are a rather recent subject in production process and supplier relationships. As the purpose of CSR is not to compromise future generations’ needs, the interesting question is how young adults manoeuvre within the area of conflict of IBPs and CSR. Several studies suggest that the young adults’ expectations for companies to act ethically has risen. Nevertheless, it is unclear how CSR in the context of IBPs affects young adults’ reasoning (and consequently their company evaluation). This consumer company evaluation is closely linked to brand equity. Brand equity has become an important tool for improving marketing outcomes. The findings of the study enable global brands to improve their customer relationships and give an understanding under which circumstances CSR can be a failure or success. The study is exploratory in nature and therefore uses a qualitative approach. This approach was supported by the literature review since very few studies juxtaposed CSR practices and IBPs. Three focus group discussions in Sweden, Austria and Germany form the base of the empirical findings. The cross-cultural perspective was included to maximize the scope of arguments and to find out about cultural similarities and differences. The literature review will be compared with the empirics which forms the analysis. This analysis part leads over to an overarching discussion. On the basis of the analysis, consumer reasoning is not that negative as previous research suggests. Successful CSR can be possible even under the circumstance of IBPs. Contextual factors such as the price still represent the most significant variable when it comes to consumption decision. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Joham, Lionel LU and Knechtel, Jan LU
supervisor
organization
course
BUSN39 20151
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Young adults, Corporate Social Responsibility, Brand Equity, Irresponsible Business Practices
language
English
id
7988947
date added to LUP
2015-09-28 11:07:30
date last changed
2015-09-28 11:07:30
@misc{7988947,
  abstract     = {Irresponsible Business Practices (IBPs) form the counterpart of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). While the latter represents a very popular field of research, IBPs are still under- researched especially when both factors are put into context. In the furniture retail industry, IBPs are a rather recent subject in production process and supplier relationships. As the purpose of CSR is not to compromise future generations’ needs, the interesting question is how young adults manoeuvre within the area of conflict of IBPs and CSR. Several studies suggest that the young adults’ expectations for companies to act ethically has risen. Nevertheless, it is unclear how CSR in the context of IBPs affects young adults’ reasoning (and consequently their company evaluation). This consumer company evaluation is closely linked to brand equity. Brand equity has become an important tool for improving marketing outcomes. The findings of the study enable global brands to improve their customer relationships and give an understanding under which circumstances CSR can be a failure or success. The study is exploratory in nature and therefore uses a qualitative approach. This approach was supported by the literature review since very few studies juxtaposed CSR practices and IBPs. Three focus group discussions in Sweden, Austria and Germany form the base of the empirical findings. The cross-cultural perspective was included to maximize the scope of arguments and to find out about cultural similarities and differences. The literature review will be compared with the empirics which forms the analysis. This analysis part leads over to an overarching discussion. On the basis of the analysis, consumer reasoning is not that negative as previous research suggests. Successful CSR can be possible even under the circumstance of IBPs. Contextual factors such as the price still represent the most significant variable when it comes to consumption decision.},
  author       = {Joham, Lionel and Knechtel, Jan},
  keyword      = {Young adults,Corporate Social Responsibility,Brand Equity,Irresponsible Business Practices},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Reasoning on Brand Equity Dimensions: Why or Why Not Young Adults Change Their Company Evaluation After CSR and Irresponsible Business Practice Information Input.},
  year         = {2015},
}