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The gut microbial composition in humans in hot occupational settings and the effects of drinking buttermilk

Song, Danping LU (2015) KLGM01 20151
Food Technology and Nutrition (M.Sc.)
Abstract
The principal aims of the present study were to examine the latent heat stress relieving capacity of drinking buttermilk and to observe the human gut microbiota in hot occupational condition. A human crossover intervention study with 12 volunteers was studied, each of them performed 3 hours of physical work in a heat chamber. During the working period, the volunteers were given buttermilk, water or no liquid. Rectal and saliva samples were obtained after and during 3 hours of physical work.

The results showed no significant differences in diversity indices of three treatment groups, we detected, by means of salivary cortisol level analysis, significantly differences between the Buttermilk and Dehydrated groups, as well as Water and... (More)
The principal aims of the present study were to examine the latent heat stress relieving capacity of drinking buttermilk and to observe the human gut microbiota in hot occupational condition. A human crossover intervention study with 12 volunteers was studied, each of them performed 3 hours of physical work in a heat chamber. During the working period, the volunteers were given buttermilk, water or no liquid. Rectal and saliva samples were obtained after and during 3 hours of physical work.

The results showed no significant differences in diversity indices of three treatment groups, we detected, by means of salivary cortisol level analysis, significantly differences between the Buttermilk and Dehydrated groups, as well as Water and Dehydrated groups at the last time-point (P = 0.017). When it comes to qPCR results, Lactobacillus and Enterobacteriaceae were detected in 9 (75%) and 12 (100%) subjects, with the medians of 4.039 (Buttermilk), 4.02 (Dehydrated), 4.081 (Water) and 7.407 (Buttermilk), 6.763 (Dehydrated), 7.64 (Water) log 16S rRNA gene copies/g rectal samples respectively.

The PCA score and scatter plots indicated that the microbiota differed widely between individuals with regard to both composition and diversity. While the PLS score and loading scatter plots based on cortisol, core temperature and T-RFLP data explicated that the observations separated in groups which representing three treatments of same subject. However, the relationship between the stress indicators (core temperature and salivary cortisol level) and the gut microbial diversity was not clearly shown. (Less)
Popular Abstract
In our gastrointestinal tract lives millions of bacteria and these living microbes are called “microbiota”. You may have not noticed that these living creatures are so important to our body that a lot of diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases and even psychological diseases are associated tightly with them. Moreover, a growing body of evidence has proved that interaction between microbiota and human bodies is essential for the development of nervous system and regulation of neural functions.

Heat stress is common issue in workers such as constructors, minors, soldiers and fire fighters across warm climate counties. When the ambient temperature reaches or exceeds 38 degree Celsius, it can deteriorate... (More)
In our gastrointestinal tract lives millions of bacteria and these living microbes are called “microbiota”. You may have not noticed that these living creatures are so important to our body that a lot of diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases and even psychological diseases are associated tightly with them. Moreover, a growing body of evidence has proved that interaction between microbiota and human bodies is essential for the development of nervous system and regulation of neural functions.

Heat stress is common issue in workers such as constructors, minors, soldiers and fire fighters across warm climate counties. When the ambient temperature reaches or exceeds 38 degree Celsius, it can deteriorate efficiency and productivity and even threaten survival. In this study, we studied a dairy product called “buttermilk”, which is a traditional dairy drink in summer to deal with the heat stress across the warm climate countries. It is a diluted form of plain yogurt and some spices, such as curry, ginger etc., are usually added according a traditional recipe in India.

In order to find the possible effects of drinking buttermilk on heat stress. We studied the response of the microbiota to buttermilk, water and no liquid ingestion during 3 hours’ physical work in a heat chamber (37 degree Celsius). The level of stress marker, cortisol (a hormone), was also measured during the test.

We found significant differences in cortisol levels between Buttermilk and Water treatment group, as well as Water and No liquid group at the end of test. The significantly differences between treatment groups indicate that buttermilk had better relieving effect on heat stress compared with water. As for the water and dehydrated group, water was more helpful dealing with heat stress, which was a very obviously answer.

When it comes to the microbiota, although no significant differences were found among three treatments, we still observed that there was a relation between stress and microbiota by the means of relating core temperature and microbiota, as well as cortisol level and microbiota. In a word, the test confirmed the theory that there is a relation between stress and gut microbiota. However, more studies have to be done to get further proof. On the other hand, the human trial is very complex system and many factors including personal and environmental perspectives have to be considered in order to get creditable results. (Less)
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author
Song, Danping LU
supervisor
organization
course
KLGM01 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Gut microbiota, Buttermilk, heat stress, livsmedelsteknologi, food technology
language
English
id
8055578
date added to LUP
2015-10-15 16:25:08
date last changed
2015-10-21 08:57:41
@misc{8055578,
  abstract     = {The principal aims of the present study were to examine the latent heat stress relieving capacity of drinking buttermilk and to observe the human gut microbiota in hot occupational condition. A human crossover intervention study with 12 volunteers was studied, each of them performed 3 hours of physical work in a heat chamber. During the working period, the volunteers were given buttermilk, water or no liquid. Rectal and saliva samples were obtained after and during 3 hours of physical work.

The results showed no significant differences in diversity indices of three treatment groups, we detected, by means of salivary cortisol level analysis, significantly differences between the Buttermilk and Dehydrated groups, as well as Water and Dehydrated groups at the last time-point (P = 0.017). When it comes to qPCR results, Lactobacillus and Enterobacteriaceae were detected in 9 (75%) and 12 (100%) subjects, with the medians of 4.039 (Buttermilk), 4.02 (Dehydrated), 4.081 (Water) and 7.407 (Buttermilk), 6.763 (Dehydrated), 7.64 (Water) log 16S rRNA gene copies/g rectal samples respectively. 

The PCA score and scatter plots indicated that the microbiota differed widely between individuals with regard to both composition and diversity. While the PLS score and loading scatter plots based on cortisol, core temperature and T-RFLP data explicated that the observations separated in groups which representing three treatments of same subject. However, the relationship between the stress indicators (core temperature and salivary cortisol level) and the gut microbial diversity was not clearly shown.},
  author       = {Song, Danping},
  keyword      = {Gut microbiota,Buttermilk,heat stress,livsmedelsteknologi,food technology},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The gut microbial composition in humans in hot occupational settings and the effects of drinking buttermilk},
  year         = {2015},
}