Advanced

Political Motivation and Annexations: A comparative study of the political motivation to annex a sovereign territory.

Ursing, Carl LU (2016) FKVK02 20161
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Unveiling political motivation as a feature in the actions of states has since the mid 20th century been a rising subject of interest in the academic research of International Relations. Research has predominatly focused on the incidence of war as a method to foster domestic support, however the manifestation of political stimulus streches past these events. The study aims to reasearch the political motivation behind annexations. By comparing the annexations of East-Timor and Tibet from a theoretical perspective of political incentive, the thesis aims to compare and analyze the structural setting in which the decision to annex is made. The study will utilize two theoretical approaches to provide a larger scientific validity for the answer.... (More)
Unveiling political motivation as a feature in the actions of states has since the mid 20th century been a rising subject of interest in the academic research of International Relations. Research has predominatly focused on the incidence of war as a method to foster domestic support, however the manifestation of political stimulus streches past these events. The study aims to reasearch the political motivation behind annexations. By comparing the annexations of East-Timor and Tibet from a theoretical perspective of political incentive, the thesis aims to compare and analyze the structural setting in which the decision to annex is made. The study will utilize two theoretical approaches to provide a larger scientific validity for the answer. First, using the diversionary war theory to analyse the structural incentives for a political motivation to be relevant. Second, rational choice theory will analyse the choice to annex. Each theory is analysed independently, presenting strong evidence that the annexations were politically motivated. The sub-conclusions will the be merged into one conclusion that briefly summarizes the results. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Ursing, Carl LU
supervisor
organization
course
FKVK02 20161
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
political decision, Indonesia, China, annexation, Tibet, East-Timor, diversionary foreign policy, rational actor
language
English
id
8875111
date added to LUP
2016-06-17 12:16:38
date last changed
2016-06-17 12:16:38
@misc{8875111,
  abstract     = {Unveiling political motivation as a feature in the actions of states has since the mid 20th century been a rising subject of interest in the academic research of International Relations. Research has predominatly focused on the incidence of war as a method to foster domestic support, however the manifestation of political stimulus streches past these events. The study aims to reasearch the political motivation behind annexations. By comparing the annexations of East-Timor and Tibet from a theoretical perspective of political incentive, the thesis aims to compare and analyze the structural setting in which the decision to annex is made. The study will utilize two theoretical approaches to provide a larger scientific validity for the answer. First, using the diversionary war theory to analyse the structural incentives for a political motivation to be relevant. Second, rational choice theory will analyse the choice to annex. Each theory is analysed independently, presenting strong evidence that the annexations were politically motivated. The sub-conclusions will the be merged into one conclusion that briefly summarizes the results.},
  author       = {Ursing, Carl},
  keyword      = {political decision,Indonesia,China,annexation,Tibet,East-Timor,diversionary foreign policy,rational actor},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Political Motivation and Annexations: A comparative study of the political motivation to annex a sovereign territory.},
  year         = {2016},
}