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New Product Development: Idea Evaluation and the Differences between Ideas having High and Low Levels of Innovation. An Investigation in the Swedish Food Industry

Hetzer, Melanie LU and Kraljic, Almir LU (2016) ENTN39 20161
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
Thesis Purpose: This study has a twofold purpose. First, the authors want to contribute to research on idea evaluation in the fuzzy front end by specifically shedding light on the food industry as this sector differs from other industries (Galizzi & Venturini, 1996; Tidd & Bessant, 2014; Triguero, Córcoles & Cuerva, 2013). Second, different evaluation criteria will be outlined for high as well as low levels of innovation.

Research Question: How does the background of ideas having high and low levels of innovation, respectively, influence idea evaluation in the fuzzy front end? Which criteria are used and how do they differ between radical and really new, and incremental new product ideas in the food industry?

Methodology: Comparing... (More)
Thesis Purpose: This study has a twofold purpose. First, the authors want to contribute to research on idea evaluation in the fuzzy front end by specifically shedding light on the food industry as this sector differs from other industries (Galizzi & Venturini, 1996; Tidd & Bessant, 2014; Triguero, Córcoles & Cuerva, 2013). Second, different evaluation criteria will be outlined for high as well as low levels of innovation.

Research Question: How does the background of ideas having high and low levels of innovation, respectively, influence idea evaluation in the fuzzy front end? Which criteria are used and how do they differ between radical and really new, and incremental new product ideas in the food industry?

Methodology: Comparing six cases within one case company the researchers iterated between an inductive and deductive approach. The data was obtained by seven in-depth qualitative semi-structured interviews.

Theoretical perspectives: Levels of Innovation: Garcia & Calantone (2002), Holahan, Sullivan & Markham (2013); Fuzzy Front End: Florén & Frishammar (2012), Koen et al. (2001); Idea Evaluation: Griffin & Page (1993), Hart et al. (2003), Magnusson, Netz & Wästlund (2014), Martinsuo & Poskela (2011), Ronkainen (1985)

Conclusions: The authors conclude this thesis with three major findings. First of all, differences regarding the criteria used for new product idea evaluation between high (market, product, strategic, technical, and intuition criteria) and low (market, product, and strategic criteria) levels of innovation could be recognised. Second, three distinct types of intuition, namely product, market, and product-market intuition, could be found. Last, the authors could see a relation between the background of the ideas and the criteria used for evaluating them. Especially, the purpose under which the new product ideas were launched influences market and strategic criteria. (Less)
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author
Hetzer, Melanie LU and Kraljic, Almir LU
supervisor
organization
course
ENTN39 20161
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
idea evaluation, evaluation criteria, fuzzy front end, new product development, levels of innovation, radical innovation, really new innovation, incremental innovation, food industry
language
English
id
8877448
date added to LUP
2016-06-17 17:06:54
date last changed
2016-06-17 17:06:54
@misc{8877448,
  abstract     = {Thesis Purpose: This study has a twofold purpose. First, the authors want to contribute to research on idea evaluation in the fuzzy front end by specifically shedding light on the food industry as this sector differs from other industries (Galizzi & Venturini, 1996; Tidd & Bessant, 2014; Triguero, Córcoles & Cuerva, 2013). Second, different evaluation criteria will be outlined for high as well as low levels of innovation.

Research Question: How does the background of ideas having high and low levels of innovation, respectively, influence idea evaluation in the fuzzy front end? Which criteria are used and how do they differ between radical and really new, and incremental new product ideas in the food industry?
 
Methodology: Comparing six cases within one case company the researchers iterated between an inductive and deductive approach. The data was obtained by seven in-depth qualitative semi-structured interviews.

Theoretical perspectives: Levels of Innovation: Garcia & Calantone (2002), Holahan, Sullivan & Markham (2013); Fuzzy Front End: Florén & Frishammar (2012), Koen et al. (2001); Idea Evaluation: Griffin & Page (1993), Hart et al. (2003), Magnusson, Netz & Wästlund (2014), Martinsuo & Poskela (2011), Ronkainen (1985)
 
Conclusions: The authors conclude this thesis with three major findings. First of all, differences regarding the criteria used for new product idea evaluation between high (market, product, strategic, technical, and intuition criteria) and low (market, product, and strategic criteria) levels of innovation could be recognised. Second, three distinct types of intuition, namely product, market, and product-market intuition, could be found. Last, the authors could see a relation between the background of the ideas and the criteria used for evaluating them. Especially, the purpose under which the new product ideas were launched influences market and strategic criteria.},
  author       = {Hetzer, Melanie and Kraljic, Almir},
  keyword      = {idea evaluation,evaluation criteria,fuzzy front end,new product development,levels of innovation,radical innovation,really new innovation,incremental innovation,food industry},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {New Product Development: Idea Evaluation and the Differences between Ideas having High and Low Levels of Innovation. An Investigation in the Swedish Food Industry},
  year         = {2016},
}