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Studies of vacuum discharges in the CLIC accelerating structure

Tropp, Anton LU (2016) EITM01 20161
Department of Electrical and Information Technology
Abstract
The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), is one of the proposed successors to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator
at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. (CERN). In CLIC, particles are accelerated by very
strong electric fields. Unfortunately, large electric fields may lead to vacuum discharges, which in turn can affect the
particle beam by disrupting the flow of energy inside the accelerating structure and deteriorate the performance of
the accelerator. Studies of the physics of vacuum discharges and its effect on the beam are crucial for the realization
of the CLIC accelerator.
The objective of this master thesis is to improve the knowledge of how vacuum discharges occur and what can
be done to prevent them. The... (More)
The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), is one of the proposed successors to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator
at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. (CERN). In CLIC, particles are accelerated by very
strong electric fields. Unfortunately, large electric fields may lead to vacuum discharges, which in turn can affect the
particle beam by disrupting the flow of energy inside the accelerating structure and deteriorate the performance of
the accelerator. Studies of the physics of vacuum discharges and its effect on the beam are crucial for the realization
of the CLIC accelerator.
The objective of this master thesis is to improve the knowledge of how vacuum discharges occur and what can
be done to prevent them. The project was done together with the CLIC group at Uppsala University. They have
their diagnostic equipment, Uppsala/CLIC X-band spectrometer (UCXS), at the High Gradient Test Stand for
research on RF-structures X-Box2, where also the accelerating structure is located. The spectrometer consists of
a collimator, a dipole and a fluorescent screen, which receives images from electrons that come from discharges.
These images have been analysed, together with Radio Frequency (RF)-signal data from X-Box2, to find discharge
positions inside the accelerating structure. The achieved results are consistent with previous analyses used with
the help of the RF signals. We see that there is a possibility to use images to study the geometrical shape of the
discharges. Longitudinal positioning of the discharges with the help of images, cannot be done. While longitudinal
positioning cannot be done, transversal have had success and can be found. Images have also been seen with multiple
features. It is hard to accredit one image to a single breakdown and a hypothesis is that there are more than
one breakdown during a pulse, creating multiple features. (Less)
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author
Tropp, Anton LU
supervisor
organization
course
EITM01 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Breakdowns, CLIC, Discharges, UCXS, RF-structures, Accelerator.
report number
LU/LHT-EIT 2016-548
language
English
id
8895078
date added to LUP
2016-11-16 14:00:41
date last changed
2016-11-16 14:00:41
@misc{8895078,
  abstract     = {The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), is one of the proposed successors to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator
at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. (CERN). In CLIC, particles are accelerated by very
strong electric fields. Unfortunately, large electric fields may lead to vacuum discharges, which in turn can affect the
particle beam by disrupting the flow of energy inside the accelerating structure and deteriorate the performance of
the accelerator. Studies of the physics of vacuum discharges and its effect on the beam are crucial for the realization
of the CLIC accelerator.
The objective of this master thesis is to improve the knowledge of how vacuum discharges occur and what can
be done to prevent them. The project was done together with the CLIC group at Uppsala University. They have
their diagnostic equipment, Uppsala/CLIC X-band spectrometer (UCXS), at the High Gradient Test Stand for
research on RF-structures X-Box2, where also the accelerating structure is located. The spectrometer consists of
a collimator, a dipole and a fluorescent screen, which receives images from electrons that come from discharges.
These images have been analysed, together with Radio Frequency (RF)-signal data from X-Box2, to find discharge
positions inside the accelerating structure. The achieved results are consistent with previous analyses used with
the help of the RF signals. We see that there is a possibility to use images to study the geometrical shape of the
discharges. Longitudinal positioning of the discharges with the help of images, cannot be done. While longitudinal
positioning cannot be done, transversal have had success and can be found. Images have also been seen with multiple
features. It is hard to accredit one image to a single breakdown and a hypothesis is that there are more than
one breakdown during a pulse, creating multiple features.},
  author       = {Tropp, Anton},
  keyword      = {Breakdowns,CLIC,Discharges,UCXS,RF-structures,Accelerator.},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Studies of vacuum discharges in the CLIC accelerating structure},
  year         = {2016},
}