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Fathers’ Parenting Expectations and Experiences and Their Longitudinal Links to Postnatal Depressive Symptomatology

Wullenkord, Marlis LU (2017) PSYP01 20161
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Despite increasing focus on the role of fathers in the face of changing societal norms, we still do not understand men’s transition to fatherhood and how it may be related to his and other family members’ well-being. Given evidence of an association between psychological parameters of this transition and postnatal depressive symptoms, we explored longitudinal paths between expectant fathers’ parenting expectations (anticipated parenting satisfaction) in the third trimester of pregnancy (T1) and their actual parenting experiences (experienced parenting satisfaction and parental stress and burden) three months after birth (T2), and studied associations with marital satisfaction and attachment security throughout the transitioning period.... (More)
Despite increasing focus on the role of fathers in the face of changing societal norms, we still do not understand men’s transition to fatherhood and how it may be related to his and other family members’ well-being. Given evidence of an association between psychological parameters of this transition and postnatal depressive symptoms, we explored longitudinal paths between expectant fathers’ parenting expectations (anticipated parenting satisfaction) in the third trimester of pregnancy (T1) and their actual parenting experiences (experienced parenting satisfaction and parental stress and burden) three months after birth (T2), and studied associations with marital satisfaction and attachment security throughout the transitioning period. Participants (N = 182) were mostly between 30 and 39 years old (n = 68, 55.8%), were employed or studied (n = 149, 94.3%), and worked an average of 39 hours per week. Most were expecting their first child (n = 121, 77.1%). Results revealed that avoidant attachment predicts formation of less positive expectations, (p < .01), whereas negatively violated expectations in the father are strongly linked to depressive symptomatology postnatally (p < .001). Furthermore, fathers anticipated parenting satisfaction was significantly higher than experienced parenting satisfaction and relationship quality significantly declined after the birth of the child, but only when fathers were expecting their first child. Despite difficulties in determining the causal direction in some of these relationships, results highlight the importance of specific psychological features for transitioning fathers’ wellbeing and for preventive work concerning perinatal paternal depression. (Less)
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author
Wullenkord, Marlis LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP01 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Parenthood, Parental Stress, Fathers, Attachment, Postnatal Depressive Symptoms, Violated Expectations, Transition
language
English
id
8900562
date added to LUP
2017-01-23 13:30:49
date last changed
2017-01-23 13:30:49
@misc{8900562,
  abstract     = {Despite increasing focus on the role of fathers in the face of changing societal norms, we still do not understand men’s transition to fatherhood and how it may be related to his and other family members’ well-being. Given evidence of an association between psychological parameters of this transition and postnatal depressive symptoms, we explored longitudinal paths between expectant fathers’ parenting expectations (anticipated parenting satisfaction) in the third trimester of pregnancy (T1) and their actual parenting experiences (experienced parenting satisfaction and parental stress and burden) three months after birth (T2), and studied associations with marital satisfaction and attachment security throughout the transitioning period. Participants (N = 182) were mostly between 30 and 39 years old (n = 68, 55.8%), were employed or studied (n = 149, 94.3%), and worked an average of 39 hours per week. Most were expecting their first child (n = 121, 77.1%). Results revealed that avoidant attachment predicts formation of less positive expectations, (p < .01), whereas negatively violated expectations in the father are strongly linked to depressive symptomatology postnatally (p < .001). Furthermore, fathers anticipated parenting satisfaction was significantly higher than experienced parenting satisfaction and relationship quality significantly declined after the birth of the child, but only when fathers were expecting their first child. Despite difficulties in determining the causal direction in some of these relationships, results highlight the importance of specific psychological features for transitioning fathers’ wellbeing and for preventive work concerning perinatal paternal depression.},
  author       = {Wullenkord, Marlis},
  keyword      = {Parenthood,Parental Stress,Fathers,Attachment,Postnatal Depressive Symptoms,Violated Expectations,Transition},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Fathers’ Parenting Expectations and Experiences and Their Longitudinal Links to Postnatal Depressive Symptomatology},
  year         = {2017},
}