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Attachment style, positive illusions and internet usage as predictors of online monitoring

Black, Rebecca LU (2017) PSYP01 20171
Department of Psychology
Abstract
The primary purposes of this study were to investigate the potential differences in interpersonal electronic surveillance (IES) between attachment styles and participant recruitment groups. People with anxious attachment were hypothesized to monitor their partners more than those who are avoidantly attached. A secondary purpose was to explore the possibility of different internet usage motivations (Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and social media) also had an influence on IES. We hypothesized participants in the social media sample would engage in IES more than the MTurk sample. Participants were recruited using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk service for the MTurk sample, and the author’s personal Facebook account along with Lund University student... (More)
The primary purposes of this study were to investigate the potential differences in interpersonal electronic surveillance (IES) between attachment styles and participant recruitment groups. People with anxious attachment were hypothesized to monitor their partners more than those who are avoidantly attached. A secondary purpose was to explore the possibility of different internet usage motivations (Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and social media) also had an influence on IES. We hypothesized participants in the social media sample would engage in IES more than the MTurk sample. Participants were recruited using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk service for the MTurk sample, and the author’s personal Facebook account along with Lund University student interest pages for the social media group. First, a MANOVA was conducted to examine possible gender and recruitment group differences. For the main analysis, a multiple linear regression was calculated with IES as the dependent variable and attachment style, gender and positive illusions as predictor variables. A moderately significant regression was found (F (8, 191) = 12.094, p < .05), R2 = .308. Attachment anxiety, recruitment group, relationship efficacy, relationship satisfaction were predictive of IES. Surprisingly, MTurk participants were predicted to engage in IES more than those in the social media sample. This study provides further evidence for the importance of researching groups beyond student populations. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Black, Rebecca LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP01 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
attachment style, positive illusions, interpersonal electronic surveillance, online monitoring, Mechanical Turk, social media, romantic relationships
language
English
id
8920535
date added to LUP
2017-07-05 10:19:16
date last changed
2017-07-05 10:19:16
@misc{8920535,
  abstract     = {The primary purposes of this study were to investigate the potential differences in interpersonal electronic surveillance (IES) between attachment styles and participant recruitment groups. People with anxious attachment were hypothesized to monitor their partners more than those who are avoidantly attached. A secondary purpose was to explore the possibility of different internet usage motivations (Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and social media) also had an influence on IES. We hypothesized participants in the social media sample would engage in IES more than the MTurk sample. Participants were recruited using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk service for the MTurk sample, and the author’s personal Facebook account along with Lund University student interest pages for the social media group. First, a MANOVA was conducted to examine possible gender and recruitment group differences. For the main analysis, a multiple linear regression was calculated with IES as the dependent variable and attachment style, gender and positive illusions as predictor variables. A moderately significant regression was found (F (8, 191) = 12.094, p < .05), R2 = .308. Attachment anxiety, recruitment group, relationship efficacy, relationship satisfaction were predictive of IES. Surprisingly, MTurk participants were predicted to engage in IES more than those in the social media sample. This study provides further evidence for the importance of researching groups beyond student populations.},
  author       = {Black, Rebecca},
  keyword      = {attachment style,positive illusions,interpersonal electronic surveillance,online monitoring,Mechanical Turk,social media,romantic relationships},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Attachment style, positive illusions and internet usage as predictors of online monitoring},
  year         = {2017},
}