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‘Partner in Prime’? Effects of Repeated Mobile Security Priming on Mood, Attachment Security and Perceived Stress in Daily Life

Oehler, Manuela LU (2017) PSYP01 20171
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Secure attachment representations, rooted in experiences with primary caregivers in early childhood, are considered a fundamental resource for a happy and healthy life. According to meta-analytical data, every third adult does not have secure attachment representations. Lacking secure attachment representations is associated with numerous health-related problems, perhaps mediated by increased susceptibility to stress and impaired emotion regulation. Even though cognitive representations of self and others tend to favor confirmation over information in order to ensure predictability in life, research has shown that early attachment experiences are non-deterministic and can be positively influenced. By inducing a feeling of attachment... (More)
Secure attachment representations, rooted in experiences with primary caregivers in early childhood, are considered a fundamental resource for a happy and healthy life. According to meta-analytical data, every third adult does not have secure attachment representations. Lacking secure attachment representations is associated with numerous health-related problems, perhaps mediated by increased susceptibility to stress and impaired emotion regulation. Even though cognitive representations of self and others tend to favor confirmation over information in order to ensure predictability in life, research has shown that early attachment experiences are non-deterministic and can be positively influenced. By inducing a feeling of attachment security through visualization tasks, the present study tested security priming on several attachment-related variables in daily life. In a randomized control trial, a total of N = 78 adults were primed via smartphone for seven consecutive days. Effects on mood, attachment security, the perception of stress and social support, resilience and self-compassion were assessed in a mixed between- and within-subjects design. Significantly lower scores in perceived stress and attachment avoidance, along with higher values of self-compassion and resilience were obtained up to seven days after the last prime, illustrating positive influence of the primes and a clear potential of smartphones for the application of security priming. The effectiveness of the attachment security induction in the present sample was higher for participants who attributed the visualization tasks to having an influence beyond the study. Suggesting great potential for security priming as mobile intervention, the need for further research in order to develop differentiated methods is outlined. (Less)
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author
Oehler, Manuela LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP01 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Security Priming, Adult Attachment, Attachment State, Smartphone, Visualization, Change, Stress, Mindfulness, Self-Compassion
language
English
id
8926441
date added to LUP
2017-10-02 09:43:35
date last changed
2017-10-02 09:43:35
@misc{8926441,
  abstract     = {Secure attachment representations, rooted in experiences with primary caregivers in early childhood, are considered a fundamental resource for a happy and healthy life. According to meta-analytical data, every third adult does not have secure attachment representations. Lacking secure attachment representations is associated with numerous health-related problems, perhaps mediated by increased susceptibility to stress and impaired emotion regulation. Even though cognitive representations of self and others tend to favor confirmation over information in order to ensure predictability in life, research has shown that early attachment experiences are non-deterministic and can be positively influenced. By inducing a feeling of attachment security through visualization tasks, the present study tested security priming on several attachment-related variables in daily life. In a randomized control trial, a total of N = 78 adults were primed via smartphone for seven consecutive days. Effects on mood, attachment security, the perception of stress and social support, resilience and self-compassion were assessed in a mixed between- and within-subjects design. Significantly lower scores in perceived stress and attachment avoidance, along with higher values of self-compassion and resilience were obtained up to seven days after the last prime, illustrating positive influence of the primes and a clear potential of smartphones for the application of security priming. The effectiveness of the attachment security induction in the present sample was higher for participants who attributed the visualization tasks to having an influence beyond the study. Suggesting great potential for security priming as mobile intervention, the need for further research in order to develop differentiated methods is outlined.},
  author       = {Oehler, Manuela},
  keyword      = {Security Priming,Adult Attachment,Attachment State,Smartphone,Visualization,Change,Stress,Mindfulness,Self-Compassion},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {‘Partner in Prime’? Effects of Repeated Mobile Security Priming on Mood, Attachment Security and Perceived Stress in Daily Life},
  year         = {2017},
}