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Future offshore wind farm construction and maintenance strategies

Strid, Jesper LU (2017) In CODEN:LUTEDX/TEIE EIE920 20172
Industrial Electrical Engineering and Automation
Abstract
With the wind farms moving further from shore, new challenges arise. Technicians must visit the turbines almost daily because of the constant need for maintenance. But when the transport time from shore to the wind farm turns into hours is some kind of permanent accommodation required
at the farm for the technicians to live on. Apart fromaccommodation the deep water is a big challenge. This paper aims to put up solutions to the future of accommodation which involves both
the near future when wind farms are still built in shallow waters and the, as of now, still experimental wind turbines installed on floating foundations.
To make a credible prediction for future operation of offshore wind industry, several parameters were studied and... (More)
With the wind farms moving further from shore, new challenges arise. Technicians must visit the turbines almost daily because of the constant need for maintenance. But when the transport time from shore to the wind farm turns into hours is some kind of permanent accommodation required
at the farm for the technicians to live on. Apart fromaccommodation the deep water is a big challenge. This paper aims to put up solutions to the future of accommodation which involves both
the near future when wind farms are still built in shallow waters and the, as of now, still experimental wind turbines installed on floating foundations.
To make a credible prediction for future operation of offshore wind industry, several parameters were studied and analyzed. How turbines are assembled was briefly touched on to understand what goes in when
designing the size on an installation vessel and how much time is needed per turbine in the installation process. General operation and maintenance is explored as well as the new and upcoming permanent accommodations put up at Horns Rev and DanTysk. Very important but also the least explored topics of failure rates and dayrates for vessels were compiled from as much information as is available. More information was found regarding the vessels themselves, in the sense of what they look like and how they operate, while information on their building costs were
quite scarce.
From the collected data were different models put up as close to land, medium distance and long distance, which pretty much corresponds to present day, near future and future. These models were boiled down to five scenarios that can fit different wind farms and their prerequisites. The scenarios were tested on three different wind farms to see which solution fares better and the results showed that a mothership could not hold the candle to neither the crane vessel for deep water nor the
platform in shallow water (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Strid, Jesper LU
supervisor
organization
course
EIE920 20172
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
publication/series
CODEN:LUTEDX/TEIE
report number
5399
language
English
id
8929094
date added to LUP
2019-03-29 13:51:38
date last changed
2019-03-29 13:51:38
@misc{8929094,
  abstract     = {With the wind farms moving further from shore, new challenges arise. Technicians must visit the turbines almost daily because of the constant need for maintenance. But when the transport time from shore to the wind farm turns into hours is some kind of permanent accommodation required 
at the farm for the technicians to live on. Apart fromaccommodation the deep water is a big challenge. This paper aims to put up solutions to the future of accommodation which involves both 
the near future when wind farms are still built in shallow waters and the, as of now, still experimental wind turbines installed on floating foundations. 
To make a credible prediction for future operation of offshore wind industry, several parameters were studied and analyzed. How turbines are assembled was briefly touched on to understand what goes in when 
designing the size on an installation vessel and how much time is needed per turbine in the installation process. General operation and maintenance is explored as well as the new and upcoming permanent accommodations put up at Horns Rev and DanTysk. Very important but also the least explored topics of failure rates and dayrates for vessels were compiled from as much information as is available. More information was found regarding the vessels themselves, in the sense of what they look like and how they operate, while information on their building costs were 
quite scarce.
From the collected data were different models put up as close to land, medium distance and long distance, which pretty much corresponds to present day, near future and future. These models were boiled down to five scenarios that can fit different wind farms and their prerequisites. The scenarios were tested on three different wind farms to see which solution fares better and the results showed that a mothership could not hold the candle to neither the crane vessel for deep water nor the 
platform in shallow water},
  author       = {Strid, Jesper},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {CODEN:LUTEDX/TEIE},
  title        = {Future offshore wind farm construction and maintenance strategies},
  year         = {2017},
}