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Pupil motivation and school-related stress: Influences from teachers

Månsson, Nicolas LU (2018) PSYP01 20171
Department of Psychology
Abstract
An important factor in pupils’ learning is the teacher’s qualities of being responsive, permissive and structured, and to see, understand and appropriately respond to the pupils’ feelings. This study examined the relation between teacher emotional intelligence, defined as “the ability to use emotions to facilitate thought, perceive, understand and manage one’s own and others emotions”, teacher work-related stress, pupil socioemotional skills, academic stress, and pupil motivation as achieved through feelings of relatedness, autonomy and competence. The study is based on data from 27 teachers and their 436 high-school pupils, in 8 different schools in the south of Sweden. As predicted, the pupils’ socioemotional skills were significantly... (More)
An important factor in pupils’ learning is the teacher’s qualities of being responsive, permissive and structured, and to see, understand and appropriately respond to the pupils’ feelings. This study examined the relation between teacher emotional intelligence, defined as “the ability to use emotions to facilitate thought, perceive, understand and manage one’s own and others emotions”, teacher work-related stress, pupil socioemotional skills, academic stress, and pupil motivation as achieved through feelings of relatedness, autonomy and competence. The study is based on data from 27 teachers and their 436 high-school pupils, in 8 different schools in the south of Sweden. As predicted, the pupils’ socioemotional skills were significantly related to both their academic stress and their motivation, and teachers’ emotional intelligence was significantly related to their own work-related stress. Among the different emotional skills, only the teacher’s ability to manage emotions was linked to pupils’ academic stress. Notably, teacher emotional intelligence did not capture substantial amounts of variance in neither pupil academic stress nor pupil motivation. Instead, the pupil’s own perception of the teaching and relationship skills of the teacher was the strongest predictor of pupil motivation and academic stress. This complex pattern of results indicates that further research is required in order to fully understand the ways in which teacher emotional skills impact on pupil motivation and academic stress. Our results bring further knowledge of the teacher’s key role in the modern educational system of school aged children. (Less)
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author
Månsson, Nicolas LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP01 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Motivation, academic stress, emotional intelligence, socioemotional skills teachers, pupils
language
English
id
8948907
date added to LUP
2018-06-13 12:42:42
date last changed
2018-06-13 12:42:42
@misc{8948907,
  abstract     = {An important factor in pupils’ learning is the teacher’s qualities of being responsive, permissive and structured, and to see, understand and appropriately respond to the pupils’ feelings. This study examined the relation between teacher emotional intelligence, defined as “the ability to use emotions to facilitate thought, perceive, understand and manage one’s own and others emotions”, teacher work-related stress, pupil socioemotional skills, academic stress, and pupil motivation as achieved through feelings of relatedness, autonomy and competence. The study is based on data from 27 teachers and their 436 high-school pupils, in 8 different schools in the south of Sweden. As predicted, the pupils’ socioemotional skills were significantly related to both their academic stress and their motivation, and teachers’ emotional intelligence was significantly related to their own work-related stress. Among the different emotional skills, only the teacher’s ability to manage emotions was linked to pupils’ academic stress. Notably, teacher emotional intelligence did not capture substantial amounts of variance in neither pupil academic stress nor pupil motivation. Instead, the pupil’s own perception of the teaching and relationship skills of the teacher was the strongest predictor of pupil motivation and academic stress. This complex pattern of results indicates that further research is required in order to fully understand the ways in which teacher emotional skills impact on pupil motivation and academic stress. Our results bring further knowledge of the teacher’s key role in the modern educational system of school aged children.},
  author       = {Månsson, Nicolas},
  keyword      = {Motivation,academic stress,emotional intelligence,socioemotional skills teachers,pupils},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Pupil motivation and school-related stress: Influences from teachers},
  year         = {2018},
}