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Talent Management For Millennials - Is it different and should it be?

Rodell, Karolina LU and Ocsko, Emma LU (2018) MGTN59 20181
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
Talent Management is a vague concept that is covering everything from recruiting, developing and retaining talents within organisations. A constant challenge in this field is to develop new generations within the workforce to fit what the organisation needs in order to do business. Generations are said to be shaped after historical and political factors that are impacting their behaviors and requirements on employers. The millennial generation is expected to be the biggest active generation on the labour market by 2020. It is often said about Millennials that they are impatient, tech-savvy, tend to job swop etc. There is however a debate in literature about how their behavior will affect organisations, and whether or not generational... (More)
Talent Management is a vague concept that is covering everything from recruiting, developing and retaining talents within organisations. A constant challenge in this field is to develop new generations within the workforce to fit what the organisation needs in order to do business. Generations are said to be shaped after historical and political factors that are impacting their behaviors and requirements on employers. The millennial generation is expected to be the biggest active generation on the labour market by 2020. It is often said about Millennials that they are impatient, tech-savvy, tend to job swop etc. There is however a debate in literature about how their behavior will affect organisations, and whether or not generational differences exist. This paper explore how organisations perceive generational differences and especially Millennials, and how this affect their Talent Management strategies. The thesis study the research gap between Talent Management and Generational differences, and aim to explore if organisations need or should adapt their Talent Management strategies after potential generational differences.

The thesis has a qualitative methodology approach, studying five organisations Talent Management strategies and their perceptions of generational differences. The data has been collected both through a literature review and interviews.

This paper concludes that there is not an aligned view of Talent Management in regards to generational differences neither in literature or in empirical findings. Further, the paper concludes that the hype about generational differences probably is an exaggeration of the reality and that organisations rather should focus their strategies on targeting the seniority level among the individuals instead of targeting generations. Still, the research topic is still not fully explored and the thesis is only providing a quick insight to a limited amount of organisations. (Less)
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author
Rodell, Karolina LU and Ocsko, Emma LU
supervisor
organization
course
MGTN59 20181
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Talent Management, Talent Management strategy, Talent, Generations, Millennials, Generational differences
language
English
id
8954876
date added to LUP
2018-07-13 16:11:26
date last changed
2018-07-13 16:11:26
@misc{8954876,
  abstract     = {Talent Management is a vague concept that is covering everything from recruiting, developing and retaining talents within organisations. A constant challenge in this field is to develop new generations within the workforce to fit what the organisation needs in order to do business. Generations are said to be shaped after historical and political factors that are impacting their behaviors and requirements on employers. The millennial generation is expected to be the biggest active generation on the labour market by 2020. It is often said about Millennials that they are impatient, tech-savvy, tend to job swop etc. There is however a debate in literature about how their behavior will affect organisations, and whether or not generational differences exist. This paper explore how organisations perceive generational differences and especially Millennials, and how this affect their Talent Management strategies. The thesis study the research gap between Talent Management and Generational differences, and aim to explore if organisations need or should adapt their Talent Management strategies after potential generational differences. 

The thesis has a qualitative methodology approach, studying five organisations Talent Management strategies and their perceptions of generational differences. The data has been collected both through a literature review and interviews. 

This paper concludes that there is not an aligned view of Talent Management in regards to generational differences neither in literature or in empirical findings. Further, the paper concludes that the hype about generational differences probably is an exaggeration of the reality and that organisations rather should focus their strategies on targeting the seniority level among the individuals instead of targeting generations. Still, the research topic is still not fully explored and the thesis is only providing a quick insight to a limited amount of organisations.},
  author       = {Rodell, Karolina and Ocsko, Emma},
  keyword      = {Talent Management,Talent Management strategy,Talent,Generations,Millennials,Generational differences},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Talent Management For Millennials - Is it different and should it be?},
  year         = {2018},
}