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How can urban gardening address social sustainability? Nature-based solution case studies in Lille, Brussels and Paris

De Bellefroid, Hippolyte LU (2018) In IIIEE Masters Thesis IMEN56 20181
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract
Nowadays, European cities contain more than 70% of the population of the continent and are still growing. This growth tends to put pressure on the challenges that urban areas are already facing. The range of these challenges is wide, such challenges being social, environmental and economical. Air pollution, health issues, increasing heat, integration, social exclusion, loneliness or mobility problems illustrate such diversity. Urban community gardening as a Nature-based Solution (NbS) could contribute to solve some of these challenges making cities greener and gathering people around common objectives. Nevertheless, despite the solutions they provide, urban community gardens often face challenges such as lack of funds or no field. The aim... (More)
Nowadays, European cities contain more than 70% of the population of the continent and are still growing. This growth tends to put pressure on the challenges that urban areas are already facing. The range of these challenges is wide, such challenges being social, environmental and economical. Air pollution, health issues, increasing heat, integration, social exclusion, loneliness or mobility problems illustrate such diversity. Urban community gardening as a Nature-based Solution (NbS) could contribute to solve some of these challenges making cities greener and gathering people around common objectives. Nevertheless, despite the solutions they provide, urban community gardens often face challenges such as lack of funds or no field. The aim of this thesis is first to examine the drivers and barriers that a project of urban gardening can face during its creation and maintenance through three case studies in Lille, Brussels and Paris. Second, it is to explore social implications of these case studies to gain a better understanding of the solutions they can bring. This study mainly answers to such questions through interviews of garden participants and managers. The used criteria for such evaluation are inspired by literature and the EKLIPSE framework. The creation and maintenance of urban gardening projects seem to often depend on the involvement of public authorities, which provides funds and space. The implications of the projects have shown to be diverse depending on their objectives. Nevertheless, education and sensitization to gardening and sustainability appeared to be among the main implications. (Less)
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author
De Bellefroid, Hippolyte LU
supervisor
organization
course
IMEN56 20181
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Nature-based Solutions, urban community garden, social impacts, barriers and drivers
publication/series
IIIEE Masters Thesis
report number
2018:3
ISSN
1401-9191
language
English
id
8958626
date added to LUP
2018-09-13 12:13:09
date last changed
2018-09-13 12:13:09
@misc{8958626,
  abstract     = {Nowadays, European cities contain more than 70% of the population of the continent and are still growing. This growth tends to put pressure on the challenges that urban areas are already facing. The range of these challenges is wide, such challenges being social, environmental and economical. Air pollution, health issues, increasing heat, integration, social exclusion, loneliness or mobility problems illustrate such diversity. Urban community gardening as a Nature-based Solution (NbS) could contribute to solve some of these challenges making cities greener and gathering people around common objectives. Nevertheless, despite the solutions they provide, urban community gardens often face challenges such as lack of funds or no field. The aim of this thesis is first to examine the drivers and barriers that a project of urban gardening can face during its creation and maintenance through three case studies in Lille, Brussels and Paris. Second, it is to explore social implications of these case studies to gain a better understanding of the solutions they can bring. This study mainly answers to such questions through interviews of garden participants and managers. The used criteria for such evaluation are inspired by literature and the EKLIPSE framework. The creation and maintenance of urban gardening projects seem to often depend on the involvement of public authorities, which provides funds and space. The implications of the projects have shown to be diverse depending on their objectives. Nevertheless, education and sensitization to gardening and sustainability appeared to be among the main implications.},
  author       = {De Bellefroid, Hippolyte},
  issn         = {1401-9191},
  keyword      = {Nature-based Solutions,urban community garden,social impacts,barriers and drivers},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {IIIEE Masters Thesis},
  title        = {How can urban gardening address social sustainability? Nature-based solution case studies in Lille, Brussels and Paris},
  year         = {2018},
}