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Har konsumtionen av rött kött förändrats i svenska grundskolor de senaste åren?

Westman, Malin LU and Johansson, Sofie LU (2019) YTHL01 20191
Food Technology and Nutrition (M.Sc.)
Food Science
Abstract
Pupils have gotten school meals in Sweden since the late 1800´s. The school meal has of course changed over the years. In the beginning the pupils only got porridge and milk. Since then they serve both meat-, fish- and chicken dishes. In recent years, many schools around the country are more concerned about the environment and therefore started to serve more plant-based diets and less red meat. Replace red meat by eating more beans, chickpeas and lentils that contributes with iron, protein and other important nutrients but only gives half as much climate impact as meat. Swedish Food agency recommend not to eat more than 500 grams red meat and charcuterie products per week. Less than 500 grams per week reduces the risk of colon- and rectal... (More)
Pupils have gotten school meals in Sweden since the late 1800´s. The school meal has of course changed over the years. In the beginning the pupils only got porridge and milk. Since then they serve both meat-, fish- and chicken dishes. In recent years, many schools around the country are more concerned about the environment and therefore started to serve more plant-based diets and less red meat. Replace red meat by eating more beans, chickpeas and lentils that contributes with iron, protein and other important nutrients but only gives half as much climate impact as meat. Swedish Food agency recommend not to eat more than 500 grams red meat and charcuterie products per week. Less than 500 grams per week reduces the risk of colon- and rectal cancer. Red meat has long been a hot discussion since it affects both the climate negatively by ruminant animals such as cows and sheep because they release methane gas. Also, the production of meat contributes to high greenhouse gas emissions which of course isn´t good. If you choose to consume meat it is best to buy Swedish meat because it favours Swedish food producers and you also care for the animals through Swedish animal welfare. It is also good if you consume organic and natural beef meat which increases biodiversity.

To get a little more clarity in these issues’ web surveys were sent out to diet managers in Sweden. Unfortunately, we did not receive the response we wanted when only 91 replies came out of 628 sent questionnaires. Questionnaires were sent online to 290 municipalities in Sweden and about 280 independent schools. An extra 58 questionnaires were sent to Stockholm county. The questionnaire contained 34 questions and took about 30 minutes to answer.

Most respondents considered to be a rural municipality at a municipal school in southern Sweden (see figures 1 – 3). In north of Sweden 24 counties total 74 which gives a response rate of 32 %. In southern Sweden, 64 counties answered a total of 218, which gives a response rate of 29 %. Questions asked in the questionnaire where whether the schools serve red meat and how often? But also, who controls how much red meat they serve weekly? With the low response rate can´t any general conclusions be done, since there is too little statistical uncertainty. The answers gave us clarity on red meat consumption and what differences there are between the primary schools in Sweden. (Less)
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author
Westman, Malin LU and Johansson, Sofie LU
supervisor
organization
course
YTHL01 20191
year
type
M1 - University Diploma
subject
keywords
School meals, meat consumption, red meat, environment/climate, food enginering, livsmedelsteknik, skolmåltider, rött kött, miljö/klimat
language
Swedish
id
8987376
date added to LUP
2019-09-03 15:48:05
date last changed
2019-09-03 15:48:05
@misc{8987376,
  abstract     = {Pupils have gotten school meals in Sweden since the late 1800´s. The school meal has of course changed over the years. In the beginning the pupils only got porridge and milk. Since then they serve both meat-, fish- and chicken dishes. In recent years, many schools around the country are more concerned about the environment and therefore started to serve more plant-based diets and less red meat. Replace red meat by eating more beans, chickpeas and lentils that contributes with iron, protein and other important nutrients but only gives half as much climate impact as meat. Swedish Food agency recommend not to eat more than 500 grams red meat and charcuterie products per week. Less than 500 grams per week reduces the risk of colon- and rectal cancer. Red meat has long been a hot discussion since it affects both the climate negatively by ruminant animals such as cows and sheep because they release methane gas. Also, the production of meat contributes to high greenhouse gas emissions which of course isn´t good. If you choose to consume meat it is best to buy Swedish meat because it favours Swedish food producers and you also care for the animals through Swedish animal welfare. It is also good if you consume organic and natural beef meat which increases biodiversity. 

To get a little more clarity in these issues’ web surveys were sent out to diet managers in Sweden. Unfortunately, we did not receive the response we wanted when only 91 replies came out of 628 sent questionnaires. Questionnaires were sent online to 290 municipalities in Sweden and about 280 independent schools. An extra 58 questionnaires were sent to Stockholm county. The questionnaire contained 34 questions and took about 30 minutes to answer.

Most respondents considered to be a rural municipality at a municipal school in southern Sweden (see figures 1 – 3). In north of Sweden 24 counties total 74 which gives a response rate of 32 %. In southern Sweden, 64 counties answered a total of 218, which gives a response rate of 29 %. Questions asked in the questionnaire where whether the schools serve red meat and how often? But also, who controls how much red meat they serve weekly? With the low response rate can´t any general conclusions be done, since there is too little statistical uncertainty. The answers gave us clarity on red meat consumption and what differences there are between the primary schools in Sweden.},
  author       = {Westman, Malin and Johansson, Sofie},
  keyword      = {School meals,meat consumption,red meat,environment/climate,food enginering,livsmedelsteknik,skolmåltider,rött kött,miljö/klimat},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Har konsumtionen av rött kött förändrats i svenska grundskolor de senaste åren?},
  year         = {2019},
}