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Evaluation of methods for detecting microbial translocation into the blood of IBD patients

So, Yunjeong LU (2019) KLGM01 20191
Food Technology and Nutrition (M.Sc.)
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a global disease affecting more than 3.5 million people in the world, resulting in a high burden to societies. More research on IBD is definitely in need to prevent the disease and treat IBD patients. The intestinal epithelial barriers of IBD patients are weakened due to the inflammation, thereby, enteric microbes in the gut may translocate to the circulating system. The blood microbiome of IBD patients has not been fully investigated yet. This study aimed at evaluating methods for detecting microbes in the blood of IBD patients. 4 blood tubes were drawn from each patient. Blood pre-treatments were required due to the presence of a clot in a blood tube and four different treatments were compared. In... (More)
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a global disease affecting more than 3.5 million people in the world, resulting in a high burden to societies. More research on IBD is definitely in need to prevent the disease and treat IBD patients. The intestinal epithelial barriers of IBD patients are weakened due to the inflammation, thereby, enteric microbes in the gut may translocate to the circulating system. The blood microbiome of IBD patients has not been fully investigated yet. This study aimed at evaluating methods for detecting microbes in the blood of IBD patients. 4 blood tubes were drawn from each patient. Blood pre-treatments were required due to the presence of a clot in a blood tube and four different treatments were compared. In order to check the viability of the microbes in the blood of IBD patients, 2 blood tubes per patient were cultivated in a traditional way on TSA, BA, MA, VRBD, and MRS. In parallel, another blood sample were enriched in TSB broth before the culturing to increase a microbial detection limit. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the last blood tube and the extracted DNA was quantified by RT-PCR. Combining pipetting and sonication was the most effective mean among other blood pre-treatments. Traditional culturing showed a positive microbial growth on 7.9% of all the cultivated plates, were 47% of them grew on TSA plates. Lactobacillus was the most found viable bacteria (31.78%) followed by Micrococcus (10.28%), Staphylococcus (10.28%), Bacillus (7.48%), and Dioszegia. (0.93%). When the patients with a same pre-treatment (pipetting + sonication) were divided into Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), CD patients correlated to the duration of the disease (p=0.0237) and UC patients showed an association with albumin (p=0.0094). Enriched blood samples showed a lower bacterial detection rate (6.01%) than the traditional culturing, which implies that TSB may not be an appropriate broth to enrich microbes from the blood. Along with the traditional culturing result, TSA showed the highest bacterial growth (71%). Bacillus seemed to be the most well adjusting in TSB and the other five media with a 20.51% detection rate, followed by Micrococcus (7.69%), Staphylococcus, and Lactobacillus (5.13%). No correlation with biomarkers was found. The number of bacterial copies in the blood was in the range of 5.90×102 ~ 1.75×104 copies/μl and the mean was 3.91×103 copies/μl (SD=3.017×103). CRP (p=0.00255), albumin(p=0.0158), and hemoglobin (p=0.0257) were significantly correlated with the number of bacterial copies. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Can bacteria in the gut travel to the blood of IBD patients and how can we to detect them?

More than 3.5 million people in the world are suffering from Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), resulting in a high burden to societies. The intestine barriers of IBD patients are weakened due to inflammation. As a result, bacteria in the gut can travel out to the blood circulating system (translocation) and possibly lead to a life-threatening disease. This study aimed to test different methods to find microbial translocation into the blood.
IBD is a broad term describing chronic and relapsing inflammatory bowel disorders. IBD includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD is a global disease and its causes are unknown. As many... (More)
Can bacteria in the gut travel to the blood of IBD patients and how can we to detect them?

More than 3.5 million people in the world are suffering from Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), resulting in a high burden to societies. The intestine barriers of IBD patients are weakened due to inflammation. As a result, bacteria in the gut can travel out to the blood circulating system (translocation) and possibly lead to a life-threatening disease. This study aimed to test different methods to find microbial translocation into the blood.
IBD is a broad term describing chronic and relapsing inflammatory bowel disorders. IBD includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD is a global disease and its causes are unknown. As many people are suffering from IBD, it is important to study IBD to prevent the disease and treat IBD patients. This study found that some bacteria in the blood such as Lactobacillus, Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, and Dioszegia were able to grow on media. Even though, for example, Lactobacillus is considered as beneficial bacteria and is often used as a probiotic, the presence of these alive bacteria in the blood of IBD patients can be dangerous. It is because they can stimulate inflammation and lead to sepsis and/or abscess. The number of bacterial DNA copies in the blood of the IBD patients were measured. It was in the range of 5.90×102 ~ 1.75×104 copies/μl and the mean was 3.91×103 copies/μl (SD=3.017×103). The number of bacterial DNA was significantly correlated with inflammation markers such as CRP (p=0.00255) and albumin(p=0.0158), and hemoglobin (p=0.0257). In other words, the more bacterial DNA in the blood, the higher inflammation level in the body. (Less)
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author
So, Yunjeong LU
supervisor
organization
course
KLGM01 20191
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Food technology, Livsmedelsteknologi
language
English
id
8994784
date added to LUP
2019-09-12 13:20:41
date last changed
2020-01-14 10:56:31
@misc{8994784,
  abstract     = {Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a global disease affecting more than 3.5 million people in the world, resulting in a high burden to societies. More research on IBD is definitely in need to prevent the disease and treat IBD patients. The intestinal epithelial barriers of IBD patients are weakened due to the inflammation, thereby, enteric microbes in the gut may translocate to the circulating system. The blood microbiome of IBD patients has not been fully investigated yet. This study aimed at evaluating methods for detecting microbes in the blood of IBD patients. 4 blood tubes were drawn from each patient. Blood pre-treatments were required due to the presence of a clot in a blood tube and four different treatments were compared. In order to check the viability of the microbes in the blood of IBD patients, 2 blood tubes per patient were cultivated in a traditional way on TSA, BA, MA, VRBD, and MRS. In parallel, another blood sample were enriched in TSB broth before the culturing to increase a microbial detection limit. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the last blood tube and the extracted DNA was quantified by RT-PCR. Combining pipetting and sonication was the most effective mean among other blood pre-treatments. Traditional culturing showed a positive microbial growth on 7.9% of all the cultivated plates, were 47% of them grew on TSA plates. Lactobacillus was the most found viable bacteria (31.78%) followed by Micrococcus (10.28%), Staphylococcus (10.28%), Bacillus (7.48%), and Dioszegia. (0.93%). When the patients with a same pre-treatment (pipetting + sonication) were divided into Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), CD patients correlated to the duration of the disease (p=0.0237) and UC patients showed an association with albumin (p=0.0094). Enriched blood samples showed a lower bacterial detection rate (6.01%) than the traditional culturing, which implies that TSB may not be an appropriate broth to enrich microbes from the blood. Along with the traditional culturing result, TSA showed the highest bacterial growth (71%). Bacillus seemed to be the most well adjusting in TSB and the other five media with a 20.51% detection rate, followed by Micrococcus (7.69%), Staphylococcus, and Lactobacillus (5.13%). No correlation with biomarkers was found. The number of bacterial copies in the blood was in the range of 5.90×102 ~ 1.75×104 copies/μl and the mean was 3.91×103 copies/μl (SD=3.017×103). CRP (p=0.00255), albumin(p=0.0158), and hemoglobin (p=0.0257) were significantly correlated with the number of bacterial copies.},
  author       = {So, Yunjeong},
  keyword      = {Food technology,Livsmedelsteknologi},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Evaluation of methods for detecting microbial translocation into the blood of IBD patients},
  year         = {2019},
}