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Should Working from Home Become the Standard? An Exploratory Study of Social Relations in Remote Work

Faust, Heidi LU and Foglio, Elena LU (2020) BUSN49 20201
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
Research Questions: In organizations which do not typically support telecommuting, how do employees experience social interactions while working remotely during a global pandemic? As organizations are forced to work remotely during a global pandemic, how did the experience influence the mentality around remote working?

Methodology: The research is an interpretive and qualitative study. We conducted semi-structured interviews, which were the main tool for empirical material collection.
Theoretical Framework Our literature review outlines previous research related to remote work and telecommuting. We highlight themes of trust, control, identity, motivation and productivity related to remote working.

Conclusions: We conclude that,... (More)
Research Questions: In organizations which do not typically support telecommuting, how do employees experience social interactions while working remotely during a global pandemic? As organizations are forced to work remotely during a global pandemic, how did the experience influence the mentality around remote working?

Methodology: The research is an interpretive and qualitative study. We conducted semi-structured interviews, which were the main tool for empirical material collection.
Theoretical Framework Our literature review outlines previous research related to remote work and telecommuting. We highlight themes of trust, control, identity, motivation and productivity related to remote working.

Conclusions: We conclude that, during the pandemic, employees experience working social interactions as a bridge to the world. They look for new ways to communicate and recreate in-person communication, which appears to be more appreciated when they are natural and genuine. The study also identifies a more open mentality towards remote working. Finally, the research contributes to literature with two new theoretical findings: motivation and productivity are negatively influenced when remote workers miss out on work-related social interactions, and trust is not such an issue under these pandemic circumstances. We argue the concept of carryover trust better summarizes the new approach to organizational trust. Future research could further explore this form of trust. (Less)
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author
Faust, Heidi LU and Foglio, Elena LU
supervisor
organization
course
BUSN49 20201
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Remote work, telecommuting, professional relationships, social interactions, pandemic, carryover trust, Covid-19
language
English
id
9011953
date added to LUP
2020-06-25 11:28:08
date last changed
2020-06-25 11:28:08
@misc{9011953,
  abstract     = {Research Questions: In organizations which do not typically support telecommuting, how do employees experience social interactions while working remotely during a global pandemic? As organizations are forced to work remotely during a global pandemic, how did the experience influence the mentality around remote working? 

Methodology: The research is an interpretive and qualitative study. We conducted semi-structured interviews, which were the main tool for empirical material collection. 
Theoretical Framework	Our literature review outlines previous research related to remote work and telecommuting. We highlight themes of trust, control, identity, motivation and productivity related to remote working.

Conclusions: We conclude that, during the pandemic, employees experience working social interactions as a bridge to the world. They look for new ways to communicate and recreate in-person communication, which appears to be more appreciated when they are natural and genuine. The study also identifies a more open mentality towards remote working. Finally, the research contributes to literature with two new theoretical findings: motivation and productivity are negatively influenced when remote workers miss out on work-related social interactions, and trust is not such an issue under these pandemic circumstances. We argue the concept of carryover trust better summarizes the new approach to organizational trust. Future research could further explore this form of trust.},
  author       = {Faust, Heidi and Foglio, Elena},
  keyword      = {Remote work,telecommuting,professional relationships,social interactions,pandemic,carryover trust,Covid-19},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Should Working from Home Become the Standard? An Exploratory Study of Social Relations in Remote Work},
  year         = {2020},
}