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Ghosts also cry [Review of the motion picture Volver].

Cardeña, Etzel LU (2007) In Contemporary Psychology: APA Review of Books 52(13).
Abstract
Reviews the film, Volver, directed by Pedro Almodóvar (2006). At the beginning of this extraordinary film, women in a small Spanish town tend to the graves of their departed; at the end, what some would consider a female "ghost" nurses a relative with cancer, as a haunting shot of a wooden door with cracks of light slowly turns dark, reminding us that in the blackness that will engulf us at the end, only the caring of others can give us solace. Within the circle of the living taking care of the dead and the dead taking care of the living, director Pedro Almodóvar takes us through a unique journey that includes murders, incestuous abuse, and, surprisingly, in the midst of it all, laughter--and an affirmation of life through the ways in... (More)
Reviews the film, Volver, directed by Pedro Almodóvar (2006). At the beginning of this extraordinary film, women in a small Spanish town tend to the graves of their departed; at the end, what some would consider a female "ghost" nurses a relative with cancer, as a haunting shot of a wooden door with cracks of light slowly turns dark, reminding us that in the blackness that will engulf us at the end, only the caring of others can give us solace. Within the circle of the living taking care of the dead and the dead taking care of the living, director Pedro Almodóvar takes us through a unique journey that includes murders, incestuous abuse, and, surprisingly, in the midst of it all, laughter--and an affirmation of life through the ways in which, albeit imperfectly, women care for others. In the female universe of Volver, Almodóvar presents a morality that does not shy away from the complexities and ambiguities of real life and is based on caring for others and interconnectedness. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
interconnectedness, living, death, caring for others, family, automatic moral judments, ghosts
in
Contemporary Psychology: APA Review of Books
volume
52
issue
13
publisher
American Psychological Association (APA)
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7b2fbffb-b9ee-4c52-8358-13d8b7007a25 (old id 1022569)
date added to LUP
2008-02-04 10:30:13
date last changed
2016-04-16 08:37:09
@misc{7b2fbffb-b9ee-4c52-8358-13d8b7007a25,
  abstract     = {Reviews the film, Volver, directed by Pedro Almodóvar (2006). At the beginning of this extraordinary film, women in a small Spanish town tend to the graves of their departed; at the end, what some would consider a female "ghost" nurses a relative with cancer, as a haunting shot of a wooden door with cracks of light slowly turns dark, reminding us that in the blackness that will engulf us at the end, only the caring of others can give us solace. Within the circle of the living taking care of the dead and the dead taking care of the living, director Pedro Almodóvar takes us through a unique journey that includes murders, incestuous abuse, and, surprisingly, in the midst of it all, laughter--and an affirmation of life through the ways in which, albeit imperfectly, women care for others. In the female universe of Volver, Almodóvar presents a morality that does not shy away from the complexities and ambiguities of real life and is based on caring for others and interconnectedness.},
  author       = {Cardeña, Etzel},
  keyword      = {interconnectedness,living,death,caring for others,family,automatic moral judments,ghosts},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {13},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x88376e0)},
  series       = {Contemporary Psychology: APA Review of Books},
  title        = {Ghosts also cry [Review of the motion picture Volver].},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {2007},
}