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Localization of granule proteins in human eosinophil bone marrow progenitors

Egesten, Arne LU ; Calafat, J; Weller, P F; Knol, E F; Janssen, H; Walz, T M and Olsson, I (1997) In International Archives of Allergy and Immunology 114(2). p.8-130
Abstract
Eosinophils have a characteristic content of cationic proteins, stored in core-containing specific granules and released at sites of inflammation; coreless granules (sometimes called primary) are present in eosinophil promyelocytes. In order to determine a possible relationship between the two granule subsets, immunoelectron-microscopic techniques were used to determine the presence and precise intragranular distribution of major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), and arylsulfatase B of eosinophil granules, as well as the Charcot-Leyden crystal (CLC) protein, in eosinophil progenitors of the bone marrow. MBP, ECP, EPO, and arylsulfatase B were observed in both coreless and core-containing... (More)
Eosinophils have a characteristic content of cationic proteins, stored in core-containing specific granules and released at sites of inflammation; coreless granules (sometimes called primary) are present in eosinophil promyelocytes. In order to determine a possible relationship between the two granule subsets, immunoelectron-microscopic techniques were used to determine the presence and precise intragranular distribution of major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), and arylsulfatase B of eosinophil granules, as well as the Charcot-Leyden crystal (CLC) protein, in eosinophil progenitors of the bone marrow. MBP, ECP, EPO, and arylsulfatase B were observed in both coreless and core-containing (specific) granules. The difference in the distribution of MBP, having a uniform distribution in coreless granules and a crystalloid distribution in core-containing (specific) granules, could indicate a maturational process of a common organelle. CLC protein was distributed in the cytosol, in the euchromatin of the nuclei, but was also present in a rare granular compartment of both immature and mature eosinophils. The present findings suggest that coreless granules develop into core-containing specific granules. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Archives of Allergy and Immunology
volume
114
issue
2
pages
8 - 130
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0030826321
ISSN
1423-0097
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f5ba5676-26a6-4dae-8c65-775685062312 (old id 1296414)
alternative location
http://www.karger.com/Article/PDF/237657
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9338606
date added to LUP
2013-08-07 14:45:56
date last changed
2016-11-23 14:40:36
@misc{f5ba5676-26a6-4dae-8c65-775685062312,
  abstract     = {Eosinophils have a characteristic content of cationic proteins, stored in core-containing specific granules and released at sites of inflammation; coreless granules (sometimes called primary) are present in eosinophil promyelocytes. In order to determine a possible relationship between the two granule subsets, immunoelectron-microscopic techniques were used to determine the presence and precise intragranular distribution of major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), and arylsulfatase B of eosinophil granules, as well as the Charcot-Leyden crystal (CLC) protein, in eosinophil progenitors of the bone marrow. MBP, ECP, EPO, and arylsulfatase B were observed in both coreless and core-containing (specific) granules. The difference in the distribution of MBP, having a uniform distribution in coreless granules and a crystalloid distribution in core-containing (specific) granules, could indicate a maturational process of a common organelle. CLC protein was distributed in the cytosol, in the euchromatin of the nuclei, but was also present in a rare granular compartment of both immature and mature eosinophils. The present findings suggest that coreless granules develop into core-containing specific granules.},
  author       = {Egesten, Arne and Calafat, J and Weller, P F and Knol, E F and Janssen, H and Walz, T M and Olsson, I},
  issn         = {1423-0097},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {8--130},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb4d6c68)},
  series       = {International Archives of Allergy and Immunology},
  title        = {Localization of granule proteins in human eosinophil bone marrow progenitors},
  volume       = {114},
  year         = {1997},
}