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Sphingolipids in human ileostomy content after meals containing milk sphingomyelin.

Ohlsson, Lena LU ; Hertervig, Erik LU ; Jönsson, Bo Ag; Duan, Rui-Dong LU ; Nyberg, Lena; Svernlöv, Rikard LU and Nilsson, Åke LU (2010) In The American journal of clinical nutrition 91. p.672-678
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Sphingomyelin occurs in modest amounts in the diet, in sloughed mucosal cells, and in bile. It is digested by the mucosal enzymes alkaline sphingomyelinase and ceramidase. In humans, alkaline sphingomyelinase is also secreted in bile. The digestion of sphingomyelin is slow and incomplete, which has been linked to the inhibition of cholesterol absorption and colonic carcinogenesis. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated whether the supply of moderate amounts of milk sphingomyelin increases the exposure of the colon to sphingomyelin and its metabolites. DESIGN: Two experimental series were performed. In experiment A, we measured the content of sphingomyelin and ceramide in human ileostomy content by HPLC during 8 h after consumption of a test... (More)
BACKGROUND: Sphingomyelin occurs in modest amounts in the diet, in sloughed mucosal cells, and in bile. It is digested by the mucosal enzymes alkaline sphingomyelinase and ceramidase. In humans, alkaline sphingomyelinase is also secreted in bile. The digestion of sphingomyelin is slow and incomplete, which has been linked to the inhibition of cholesterol absorption and colonic carcinogenesis. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated whether the supply of moderate amounts of milk sphingomyelin increases the exposure of the colon to sphingomyelin and its metabolites. DESIGN: Two experimental series were performed. In experiment A, we measured the content of sphingomyelin and ceramide in human ileostomy content by HPLC during 8 h after consumption of a test meal containing 250 mg milk sphingomyelin. In experiment B, we measured the molecular species of sphingomyelin and ceramide by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry after doses of 50, 100, or 200 mg sphingomyelin. RESULTS: In experiment A, the average increase in ileostomy content of ceramide plus sphingomyelin amounted to 19% of the fed dose of sphingomyelin. In experiment B, the output of C-22:0-sphingomyelin, C-23:0-sphingomyelin, C-24:0-sphingomyelin, and sphingosine increased significantly and palmitoyl-sphingomyelin increased proportionally less. Outputs and concentrations of palmitoyl-ceramide and sphingosine showed great individual variation, and stearoyl-sphingomyelin and stearoyl-ceramide did not increase after the meals. Although the output of long-chain sphingomyelin species increased significantly, the data indicated that >81% of all measured sphingomyelin species had been digested. CONCLUSIONS: Humans digest and absorb most of the sphingomyelin in normal diets. The level of sphingolipid metabolites to which the colon is exposed can, however, be influenced by realistic amounts of dietary sphingomyelin. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The American journal of clinical nutrition
volume
91
pages
672 - 678
publisher
American Society for Clinical Nutrition
external identifiers
  • WOS:000274706500024
  • PMID:20071649
  • Scopus:77749279629
ISSN
1938-3207
DOI
10.3945/ajcn.2009.28311
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
924dc947-7f51-4456-b538-ca171ad4879d (old id 1541087)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20071649?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-02-02 13:32:58
date last changed
2016-11-09 09:09:15
@misc{924dc947-7f51-4456-b538-ca171ad4879d,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Sphingomyelin occurs in modest amounts in the diet, in sloughed mucosal cells, and in bile. It is digested by the mucosal enzymes alkaline sphingomyelinase and ceramidase. In humans, alkaline sphingomyelinase is also secreted in bile. The digestion of sphingomyelin is slow and incomplete, which has been linked to the inhibition of cholesterol absorption and colonic carcinogenesis. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated whether the supply of moderate amounts of milk sphingomyelin increases the exposure of the colon to sphingomyelin and its metabolites. DESIGN: Two experimental series were performed. In experiment A, we measured the content of sphingomyelin and ceramide in human ileostomy content by HPLC during 8 h after consumption of a test meal containing 250 mg milk sphingomyelin. In experiment B, we measured the molecular species of sphingomyelin and ceramide by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry after doses of 50, 100, or 200 mg sphingomyelin. RESULTS: In experiment A, the average increase in ileostomy content of ceramide plus sphingomyelin amounted to 19% of the fed dose of sphingomyelin. In experiment B, the output of C-22:0-sphingomyelin, C-23:0-sphingomyelin, C-24:0-sphingomyelin, and sphingosine increased significantly and palmitoyl-sphingomyelin increased proportionally less. Outputs and concentrations of palmitoyl-ceramide and sphingosine showed great individual variation, and stearoyl-sphingomyelin and stearoyl-ceramide did not increase after the meals. Although the output of long-chain sphingomyelin species increased significantly, the data indicated that >81% of all measured sphingomyelin species had been digested. CONCLUSIONS: Humans digest and absorb most of the sphingomyelin in normal diets. The level of sphingolipid metabolites to which the colon is exposed can, however, be influenced by realistic amounts of dietary sphingomyelin.},
  author       = {Ohlsson, Lena and Hertervig, Erik and Jönsson, Bo Ag and Duan, Rui-Dong and Nyberg, Lena and Svernlöv, Rikard and Nilsson, Åke},
  issn         = {1938-3207},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {672--678},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xaf92388)},
  series       = {The American journal of clinical nutrition},
  title        = {Sphingolipids in human ileostomy content after meals containing milk sphingomyelin.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2009.28311},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2010},
}