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Risk of Birth Abnormalities in the Offspring of Men With a History of Cancer: A Cohort Study Using Danish and Swedish National Registries.

Ståhl, Olof LU ; Boyd, Heather A; Giwercman, Aleksander LU ; Lindholm, Morten; Jensen, Allan; Krüger Kjær, Susanne; Anderson, Harald LU ; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva LU and Rylander, Lars LU (2011) In Journal of the National Cancer Institute 103. p.398-406
Abstract
Background The potential mutagenic effects of cancer therapies and the growing number of young male cancer survivors have given rise to concern about the health of their offspring. Methods We identified all singleton children born alive in Denmark between 1994 and 2004 and in Sweden between 1994 and 2005 (n = 1 777 765). Of the 8670 children with a paternal history of cancer, 8162 were conceived naturally and 508 were conceived using assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) (in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmatic sperm injection). Of the 1 769 0795 children without a paternal history of cancer, 25 926 were conceived using ARTs. Associations between paternal history of cancer and risk of adverse birth outcomes of children conceived... (More)
Background The potential mutagenic effects of cancer therapies and the growing number of young male cancer survivors have given rise to concern about the health of their offspring. Methods We identified all singleton children born alive in Denmark between 1994 and 2004 and in Sweden between 1994 and 2005 (n = 1 777 765). Of the 8670 children with a paternal history of cancer, 8162 were conceived naturally and 508 were conceived using assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) (in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmatic sperm injection). Of the 1 769 0795 children without a paternal history of cancer, 25 926 were conceived using ARTs. Associations between paternal history of cancer and risk of adverse birth outcomes of children conceived naturally or by ARTs were investigated using log-linear binomial models, yielding risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The offspring of male cancer survivors were more likely to have major congenital abnormalities than the offspring of fathers with no history of cancer (RR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.05 to 1.31, P = .0043, 3.7% vs 3.2%). However, the mode of conception (natural conception or ARTs) did not modify the association between paternal history of cancer and risk of congenital abnormalities (natural conception, RR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.31; ARTs, RR = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.80 to 1.87, P(interaction) = .84). Conclusion We observed a statistically significant but modest increase in the risk of major congenital abnormalities among offspring of males with a history of cancer, independent of the mode of conception. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
volume
103
pages
398 - 406
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • WOS:000288020800009
  • PMID:21303994
  • Scopus:79952336354
ISSN
1460-2105
DOI
10.1093/jnci/djq550
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
baefa2cc-c3bb-470a-a797-cc617cbdba19 (old id 1832131)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21303994?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-03-01 13:40:30
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:25:39
@misc{baefa2cc-c3bb-470a-a797-cc617cbdba19,
  abstract     = {Background The potential mutagenic effects of cancer therapies and the growing number of young male cancer survivors have given rise to concern about the health of their offspring. Methods We identified all singleton children born alive in Denmark between 1994 and 2004 and in Sweden between 1994 and 2005 (n = 1 777 765). Of the 8670 children with a paternal history of cancer, 8162 were conceived naturally and 508 were conceived using assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) (in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmatic sperm injection). Of the 1 769 0795 children without a paternal history of cancer, 25 926 were conceived using ARTs. Associations between paternal history of cancer and risk of adverse birth outcomes of children conceived naturally or by ARTs were investigated using log-linear binomial models, yielding risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The offspring of male cancer survivors were more likely to have major congenital abnormalities than the offspring of fathers with no history of cancer (RR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.05 to 1.31, P = .0043, 3.7% vs 3.2%). However, the mode of conception (natural conception or ARTs) did not modify the association between paternal history of cancer and risk of congenital abnormalities (natural conception, RR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.31; ARTs, RR = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.80 to 1.87, P(interaction) = .84). Conclusion We observed a statistically significant but modest increase in the risk of major congenital abnormalities among offspring of males with a history of cancer, independent of the mode of conception.},
  author       = {Ståhl, Olof and Boyd, Heather A and Giwercman, Aleksander and Lindholm, Morten and Jensen, Allan and Krüger Kjær, Susanne and Anderson, Harald and Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva and Rylander, Lars},
  issn         = {1460-2105},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {398--406},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xba18400)},
  series       = {Journal of the National Cancer Institute},
  title        = {Risk of Birth Abnormalities in the Offspring of Men With a History of Cancer: A Cohort Study Using Danish and Swedish National Registries.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djq550},
  volume       = {103},
  year         = {2011},
}