Advanced

Housing accessibility and its associations with participation among older adults living with long-standing spinal cord injury

Norin, Lizette LU ; Slaug, Björn LU ; Haak, Maria LU ; Jörgensen, Sophie LU ; Lexell, Jan LU and Iwarsson, Susanne LU (2016) In Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine
Abstract

Objectives: To describe the housing situation and aspects of participation among older adults living with long-standing spinal cord injury (SCI) with attention to SCI severity, and to examine whether and how objective housing accessibility (based on objectively measurable criteria) is associated with aspects of participation. Design: Cross-sectional study utilizing the assessment tools Impact on Participation and Autonomy (IPA) and Housing Enabler (HE). Adjusting for demographic, social and injury related data, associations between objective housing accessibility and aspects of participation were analyzed by means of ordinal regression models. Setting: Home and community settings. Participants: Older adults (≥ 50 years) (N = 123), with... (More)

Objectives: To describe the housing situation and aspects of participation among older adults living with long-standing spinal cord injury (SCI) with attention to SCI severity, and to examine whether and how objective housing accessibility (based on objectively measurable criteria) is associated with aspects of participation. Design: Cross-sectional study utilizing the assessment tools Impact on Participation and Autonomy (IPA) and Housing Enabler (HE). Adjusting for demographic, social and injury related data, associations between objective housing accessibility and aspects of participation were analyzed by means of ordinal regression models. Setting: Home and community settings. Participants: Older adults (≥ 50 years) (N = 123), with a traumatic or non-traumatic SCI for at least 10 years. To make comparisons within the sample, three groups of SCI severity were formed using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale. Results: Housing adaptations and environmental barriers were common and differed between SCI severity groups; those with AIS D injuries had fewer adaptations and more environmental barriers indoors. A majority of the participants in the total sample perceived their participation as good or very good in most of the IPA activities studied. Accessibility indoors was significantly associated with autonomy indoors (P = 0.009), family role (P = 0.002) and participation problems (P = 0.004); more accessibility problems were associated with less participation and more participation problems. Conclusion: This study indicates that optimizing the housing environment for older adults with SCI can potentially increase their participation and make them more autonomous. Further studies based on longitudinal data are needed to determine the causality of the associations identified.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Architectural accessibility, Environment, Health services for persons with disabilities, Occupational therapy, Personal autonomy, Spinal cord injuries
in
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine
pages
11 pages
publisher
Maney Publishing
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84987899218
ISSN
1079-0268
DOI
10.1080/10790268.2016.1224541
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1f983c5b-faa1-4eac-bf00-b59a3a9dbb85
date added to LUP
2016-10-03 14:33:11
date last changed
2016-10-20 10:59:31
@misc{1f983c5b-faa1-4eac-bf00-b59a3a9dbb85,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: To describe the housing situation and aspects of participation among older adults living with long-standing spinal cord injury (SCI) with attention to SCI severity, and to examine whether and how objective housing accessibility (based on objectively measurable criteria) is associated with aspects of participation. Design: Cross-sectional study utilizing the assessment tools Impact on Participation and Autonomy (IPA) and Housing Enabler (HE). Adjusting for demographic, social and injury related data, associations between objective housing accessibility and aspects of participation were analyzed by means of ordinal regression models. Setting: Home and community settings. Participants: Older adults (≥ 50 years) (N = 123), with a traumatic or non-traumatic SCI for at least 10 years. To make comparisons within the sample, three groups of SCI severity were formed using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale. Results: Housing adaptations and environmental barriers were common and differed between SCI severity groups; those with AIS D injuries had fewer adaptations and more environmental barriers indoors. A majority of the participants in the total sample perceived their participation as good or very good in most of the IPA activities studied. Accessibility indoors was significantly associated with autonomy indoors (P = 0.009), family role (P = 0.002) and participation problems (P = 0.004); more accessibility problems were associated with less participation and more participation problems. Conclusion: This study indicates that optimizing the housing environment for older adults with SCI can potentially increase their participation and make them more autonomous. Further studies based on longitudinal data are needed to determine the causality of the associations identified.</p>},
  author       = {Norin, Lizette and Slaug, Björn and Haak, Maria and Jörgensen, Sophie and Lexell, Jan and Iwarsson, Susanne},
  issn         = {1079-0268},
  keyword      = {Architectural accessibility,Environment,Health services for persons with disabilities,Occupational therapy,Personal autonomy,Spinal cord injuries},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  pages        = {11},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb16d830)},
  series       = {Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine},
  title        = {Housing accessibility and its associations with participation among older adults living with long-standing spinal cord injury},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10790268.2016.1224541},
  year         = {2016},
}