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Reconciliation and the Search for a Shared Moral Landscape – An exploration based upon a study of Northern Ireland and South Africa

Ericson, Maria LU (2001)
Abstract (Swedish)
Popular Abstract in Swedish

Denna avhandling fokuserar på frågan om försoning och (sökandet efter) värdegemenskap. Värden sätts in i ett större sammanhang, i ett så kallat "moraliskt landskap". Avhandlingen beskriver först olika hinder för försoning och dialog i Nordirland och Sydafrika i form av följande komponenter av det moraliska landskapet: -Erfarenheter (av trauma, segregation, ojämlikhet) - Motstridiga uppfattningar om konflikten, dess historia och dess lösning - Exklusiva identifikationer och lojaliteter - Vissa bilder av sig själv och "den andre" (dvs motståndaren) - Vissa normer för konfliktbeteende - Motstridiga definitioner av centrala värden såsom "fred" och "rättvisa"



Sedan beskrivs hur... (More)
Popular Abstract in Swedish

Denna avhandling fokuserar på frågan om försoning och (sökandet efter) värdegemenskap. Värden sätts in i ett större sammanhang, i ett så kallat "moraliskt landskap". Avhandlingen beskriver först olika hinder för försoning och dialog i Nordirland och Sydafrika i form av följande komponenter av det moraliska landskapet: -Erfarenheter (av trauma, segregation, ojämlikhet) - Motstridiga uppfattningar om konflikten, dess historia och dess lösning - Exklusiva identifikationer och lojaliteter - Vissa bilder av sig själv och "den andre" (dvs motståndaren) - Vissa normer för konfliktbeteende - Motstridiga definitioner av centrala värden såsom "fred" och "rättvisa"



Sedan beskrivs hur dessa komponenter har addresserats av försoningsinitiativ i Sydafrika och på Nordirland, närmare bestämt av: 1) Initiativ, särskilt av ekumeniska grupper, för att överbrygga motsättningar mellan katoliker och protestanter på Nordirland. 2) Initiativ för att komma till rätta med det förflutna i Sydafrika, särskilt i sannings- och försoningskommissionens arbete och de debatter den gett upphov till.



Avhandlingen beskriver både gemensamma och specifika drag i dessa försoningsprocesser, möjligheter och problem som dykt upp, vad som återstår och vad vi kan lära. På grundval av denna beskrivning identifieras också olika förutsättningar för en dialog som syftar till att nå fram till ökad värdegemenskap, vilket är en central fråga i global etik. (Less)
Abstract
In Northern Ireland and South Africa obstacles to reconciliation were found in these elements of a “moral landscape”: – Experiences of trauma, separation and inequalities, – Divergent views of the conflict and of “the other”, – Opposing identifications and loyalties, – Norms for interaction, – Contestant interpretations of values such as “peace” and “justice”. This study describes how these obstacles have been addressed in: 1) Efforts, particularly by ecumenical groups, to bridge the Catholic/Protestant divide in Northern Ireland. 2) The work of, and debates surrounding, the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission. On the basis of these dialogues in adverse circumstances, this study suggests some prerequisites for “emancipatory... (More)
In Northern Ireland and South Africa obstacles to reconciliation were found in these elements of a “moral landscape”: – Experiences of trauma, separation and inequalities, – Divergent views of the conflict and of “the other”, – Opposing identifications and loyalties, – Norms for interaction, – Contestant interpretations of values such as “peace” and “justice”. This study describes how these obstacles have been addressed in: 1) Efforts, particularly by ecumenical groups, to bridge the Catholic/Protestant divide in Northern Ireland. 2) The work of, and debates surrounding, the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission. On the basis of these dialogues in adverse circumstances, this study suggests some prerequisites for “emancipatory conversations” – a central question in the search for a global ethics.



Ecumenical groups in Northern Ireland pursued a middle road between Unionism and Nationalism, focused on relationships between Catholics and Protestants, and stressed their shared responsibility. In South Africa there was more stress on the relationship between individual victims and perpetrators, on the responsibility of one group (i.e. whites) to repent, and on redistribution and material reparations as part of reconciliation. Initiatives for reconciliation in both contexts stressed dialogue, tolerance and non-violence. They were inspired by the notion of every person being created in God’s image and by a supreme loyalty to the God of all people. Particular attention was given to “storysharing”, i.e. the sharing of personal experiences of the conflict, rather than debating various viewpoints. Prerequisites for being able both to speak and to listen to “the other side” were: safety; equality of power; recognition of the humanity of “the other” and of one’s own human dignity; preparedness for critical self-examination; concern with one’s adversary’s welfare, and that the participants had achieved a sense of security in their own identities and some healing from their own traumas. A commitment to each other and the shared place of residence could serve as a basis for common ground, as could similar experiences of trauma, of parenthood, and (in Northern Ireland) of social class. Certain dilemmas were identified, such as what safety needs to prioritise, what stories to emphasise in the official discourse, and seeking harmony versus struggling to change inequalities. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
opponent
  • Prof Wiberg, Håkan, Copenhagen Peace Research Institute (COPRI), Copenhagen
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
global ethics, dialogue, General, reconciliation, systematic and practical Christian theology, systematisk och praktisk), Kristen teologi (allmän, Northern Ireland, Non-Christian religions, Världsreligioner (ej kristendom), Theology, Teologi, peace building, conflict resolution, justice, ecumenism, forgiveness, South Africa, Truth and Reconciliation Commission
pages
465 pages
publisher
A printed version will be published by Peter Lang, GmbH, Europaeischer Verlag der Wissenschaften, later in the year 2001,
defense location
Edens hörsal, Statsvetenskapliga inst, Paradisgatan 5
defense date
2001-04-07 14:15
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
741be25c-cf62-441e-8f4a-bdd0b3240566 (old id 20338)
date added to LUP
2007-05-25 13:19:46
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:45:14
@misc{741be25c-cf62-441e-8f4a-bdd0b3240566,
  abstract     = {In Northern Ireland and South Africa obstacles to reconciliation were found in these elements of a “moral landscape”: – Experiences of trauma, separation and inequalities, – Divergent views of the conflict and of “the other”, – Opposing identifications and loyalties, – Norms for interaction, – Contestant interpretations of values such as “peace” and “justice”. This study describes how these obstacles have been addressed in: 1) Efforts, particularly by ecumenical groups, to bridge the Catholic/Protestant divide in Northern Ireland. 2) The work of, and debates surrounding, the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission. On the basis of these dialogues in adverse circumstances, this study suggests some prerequisites for “emancipatory conversations” – a central question in the search for a global ethics.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Ecumenical groups in Northern Ireland pursued a middle road between Unionism and Nationalism, focused on relationships between Catholics and Protestants, and stressed their shared responsibility. In South Africa there was more stress on the relationship between individual victims and perpetrators, on the responsibility of one group (i.e. whites) to repent, and on redistribution and material reparations as part of reconciliation. Initiatives for reconciliation in both contexts stressed dialogue, tolerance and non-violence. They were inspired by the notion of every person being created in God’s image and by a supreme loyalty to the God of all people. Particular attention was given to “storysharing”, i.e. the sharing of personal experiences of the conflict, rather than debating various viewpoints. Prerequisites for being able both to speak and to listen to “the other side” were: safety; equality of power; recognition of the humanity of “the other” and of one’s own human dignity; preparedness for critical self-examination; concern with one’s adversary’s welfare, and that the participants had achieved a sense of security in their own identities and some healing from their own traumas. A commitment to each other and the shared place of residence could serve as a basis for common ground, as could similar experiences of trauma, of parenthood, and (in Northern Ireland) of social class. Certain dilemmas were identified, such as what safety needs to prioritise, what stories to emphasise in the official discourse, and seeking harmony versus struggling to change inequalities.},
  author       = {Ericson, Maria},
  keyword      = {global ethics,dialogue,General,reconciliation,systematic and practical Christian theology,systematisk och praktisk),Kristen teologi (allmän,Northern Ireland,Non-Christian religions,Världsreligioner (ej kristendom),Theology,Teologi,peace building,conflict resolution,justice,ecumenism,forgiveness,South Africa,Truth and Reconciliation Commission},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {465},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa9f4ff8)},
  title        = {Reconciliation and the Search for a Shared Moral Landscape – An exploration based upon a study of Northern Ireland and South Africa},
  year         = {2001},
}